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There is an “it” factor when looking for interns to train in your private practice.

Here’s how I’ve found amazing interns that stay at my clinic even after graduation.

Over the past several years I have trained and mentored many graduate students and new graduates working toward clinical licensure. Working with interns has been a great way to build my practice, leverage my time, and satisfy the part of me that loves mentoring.

Most graduate students who train at my clinic during school are offered a therapist position after graduation which creates a win-win situation — the student gets a job they’re already trained for and I get to add talented and enthusiastic therapists to my team! After interviewing several therapists, I’ve learned to be very selective about who I bring on at Wasatch Family Therapy.

I recently consulted with a private practice therapist who has a waiting list for new clients. As we started exploring the option of hiring a graduate student to train she expressed some concerns. Her biggest questions were:

  • How do you find talented graduates students?
  • When interviewing potential student interns, what qualities do you look for?
  • How do you know if they’re going to be a good therapist and work well with your private practice clientele?

So, here’s what I’ve learned after several years of interviewing and hiring student interns…

How do you find gifted graduate students?

  • Contact local graduate programs in your discipline and see if they are  looking for internship/practicum placements for their students.
  • Fill out the necessary paperwork to be an approved placement at local schools, even if you’re not quite ready to bring on a student. When you’re ready to train an intern you’ll already be approved.
  • Reach out to traditional and for-profit schools. I’ve found that the for-profit programs (Argosy University and University of Phoenix in UT) are more flexible in terms of internship start times and the number of clinical hours per week required. I have been very pleased with the caliber of students from private, for-profit universities.

When interviewing potential student interns, what qualities do you look for?

  • After interviewing grad students for several years now, the biggest “it” factor I look for is likeability. I know that sounds simple, but it’s true. If I enjoy talking to them and I trust them during the interview process, then it’s likely they will quickly put clients at ease, too.
  • I look for people were “born” therapists and just need the formal credentials and trainig in order to actually to all themselves a therapist.
  • I look for people who have long-term goals that include working in a private practice setting, like mine, beyond the internship.
  • I always ask about their style of handling conflict, feedback, or direction in work settings and discuss several scenarios that might arise in private practice.

How do you know if they’re going to be a good therapist and work well with your private practice clientele?

  • You don’t. There’s no guarantee that someone will be an effective clinician. I suggest that you make sure that there is a clause in your contract that you can stop training a grad student that isn’t working well with your clientele.
  • I often require that interested graduate students volunteer at my clinic for several months before securing a clinical internship. There is such a high demand for interns in my area that we can be extremely selective. This volunteer time gives us both a chance to make sure it’s a good fit.
  • A 3-step interview process helps screen potential interns before bringing on.  I do an initial interview, a second interview, and a “mock” case presentation at team meeting. While I ultimately decide which intern we will “hire,” I trust my team’s input as to whether the student would be a good fit.

While it’s always a risk bringing on a new student to my team, I find comfort in the fact that the number one predictor of client outcome is the strength of the therapeutic alliance. Generally, if it’s easy for me and my team to connect with a grad student in the interview process, it’s safe to say that clients will feel the same way about them. Ultimately, it’s your practice and your reputation on the line as the owner of your practice.

Have you trained interns in your private practice? I’d love to hear about where you find them, how you screen them, and if it’s worked to build your practice!

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(c) Can Stock Photo

 



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APA Reference
Hanks, J. (2012). How To Find Top Student Interns To Grow Your Practice. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 25, 2014, from http://pro.psychcentral.com/private-practice/2012/06/how-to-find-top-student-interns-to-grow-your-practice/

    Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 22 Jun 2012

 

 
 
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