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Business Library

  • How to Build Trust with a Client Before the First Session
    A strong online presence helps potentials clients trust you and choose you when they are ready for therapy. Clients sometimes have a hard time trusting a new therapist.  It’s understandable: who feels comfortable telling their innermost problems to a complete stranger?  But trust is a critical part of the client/ therapist relationship if any real progress is to be made.  Thankfully, there are ways to build trust before your client even walks in the door.
  • Top 10 Private Pratice Toolbox Post of 2013
    As the year draws to a close it's always fun to check Google Analytics and see which blog posts caught your attention throughout the year. The following is a list of the posts with the most unique page views on this blog during the 2013 calendar year. Interestingly, some of the most visited articles are from past years, but are obviously topics that are of interest to therapists this year. I've featured many guest posts this year, and two of them make the top 10 list! 1) What I wish I'd known before starting a private practice Seasoned therapists share what they wish they'd known prior to starting their private practice in an attempt to help private practice newbies avoid the same mistakes.
  • Creating Income Stability: Publishing Success Story
    Income stability in private practice can be challenging. Publishing is one way to create an additional income stream. In addition to traditional publishing there are many options for self-publishing an e-book, a workbook, produce a product, or create downloadable resources like videos, handouts, or audio resources. Publishing doesn't have to be a daunting task.  You may already have content from workshops, papers, blog posts, and your clinical experience that you can re-purpose as part of a book or workbook. While publishing may sound daunting getting started may be easier than you think. Here are some ideas to help you get stared developing publishable content.
  • 5 Key Questions to Help You Develop Multiple Income Streams
    By developing additional income private practitioners can create greater income stability and add variety to professional endeavors. Developing multiple income streams, or revenue from sources other than direct client hours, is a great way to create greater income stability as a private practice therapist. I'm often asked, "Where do I start when developing additional income streams?" In response to that question I've put together five key questions to help inspire you and guide you in developing additional sources of income.
  • 10 Best FREE iPad Apps for a Productive Private Practice
    In this guest post counselor and consultant Clinton Power shares his top iPad App picks for managing a private Practice I just love my iPad mini. It goes everywhere with me and has become such a valuable asset in helping me run my therapy and coaching business in an efficient and productive manner. So I’ve compiled a list of my top 10 best iPad apps that help me run my business day-to-day. And best of all, they are all FREE! Please note that any apps below that save to the cloud are not HIPAA compliant and I don’t advise you use them for storing any confidential client data.
  • Why I Only Hire W-2 Therapists (W-2 vs. 1099 part 3)
    I've noticed that private practice therapist tend to hire additional therapists as 1099 contract employees. Reasons frequently cited for choosing to hire therapists as 1099 employees is that they don't have to pay the therapists taxes. While it may be more "affordable" to hire therapists as contractors, in my experience, there are also "costs." (For an summary of the difference between W-2 and 1099 employees read part 1 in this series. To hear about my employment tax audit adventure read part 2.) According to the IRS website, the general rule for classifying 1099 independent contractor is "if the payer has the right to control or direct only the result of the work and not what will be done and how it will be done" (italics added). It also states that an employee is not a contract employee if the services "can be controlled by an employer (what will be done and how it will be done)" and if "the employer has the legal right to control the details of how the services are performed."
  • Would Your Practice Survive An Employment Tax Audit? (1099 vs. W-2 part 2)
    Does the state tax commission really take the time to audit small private practices? I didn't think so, until my practice was selected for an audit. A few years ago my clinic was selected for an employment tax audit. Lucky me, right? When the auditor walked into my office suite and saw many offices with different names on the doors, he looked at me pleadingly and said, "Please, please don't tell me that these therapists are all classified as 1099 contractors."
  • The Difference Between Hiring Therapists As 1099 vs. W-2 (part 1)
    Should you hire additional therapists for your practice as 1099 or W-2 employees? I'll walk you through the decision process in this blog series so you can make an informed decision. If your private practice is thriving and you are considering hiring additional therapists, one of the major questions is how to structure the employment relationship. Should you hire additional therapists as a 1099 contractor or W-2 employee? In my private practice consulting experience and based on recent discussions in my Private Practice Toolbox Group it seems that most private practice therapists favor hiring therapists as 1099 contractors. When I ask why I often hear something like, "I hire 1099's because then I'm not responsible to pay the therapists employment taxes and it provides some cushion against legal responsibility for the acts of therapists providing contract services." While these statements are true, there is a lot more to consider when structuring the employment relationship and misclassification can be a costly mistake.
  • 5 Steps To Transforming Your Practice Into A Thriving Business
    Guest post by Edita Atteck I believe I know who you are. You are here to be of service to others and you want to create a thriving business. You want to get client referrals, retain existing clients, and you don’t want to live from paycheck to paycheck.  You want to have a good reputation and earn client's trust. I know first hand how starting a business is a challenge. I’ve been there and I fully respect your feelings. I left my corporate career to pursue my passion and committed to turning it into a business helping one person at a time. And I am here today to share with you six steps I believe can help guide you to building a practice that will help you and your business to thrive.
  • The $12,000 Mistake Many Therapists Make
    Ending sessions on time or charging more for extended sessions not only models good boundaries, it's good for your business. What's the big deal about giving a few extra minutes to your clients? After all, we are in this field to help others and we are generous souls by nature, right? Yes, we are. However, an on-going pattern of giving away a few minutes each session adds up over a year's time. Let's say you see 10 clients for 50 minute sessions per week= 500 minutes. If you go over 10 minutes with each client you're doing 600 minutes of therapy and only being paid for 500 minutes. That means you're giving away 100 minutes of therapy every week. After one year of giving away 100 minutes every week you are giving away 5200 minutes of free therapy. 5200 minutes is the equivalent of 104 free 50 minute sessions every year. If you charge $115 per session your practice is giving away $11, 960 of free therapy a year!
 
 
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