Subscribe to our professional mailing list

* indicates required
Close

Psych Central Pro

Become a fan on Facebook! Follow us on Twitter! Subscribe to RSS Feed

Psych Central Professional

General Library

  • How to Create and Sell Your First E-book (part 2)
    In this guest post, counselor and consultant Clinton Power share how to put the finishing touches on your E-book and how to get the word out and sell your book. (Read part 1 how to create your first E-Book) Use a graphic designer to make your E-book stunning If you're planning on creating a PDF version of your E-book to sell through your website, you definitely want to get it professionally designed. Your designer can then employ visuals, highlight quotes, and use attractive fonts and graphic design elements to draw the reader in and make reading your E-book a pleasure. Your designer will also create a compelling cover page, which is essential as it will make a big difference whether people are attracted to your E-book or not. If you're going down the Amazon route, you won't need a designer to design the inside, but you will need an awesome cover design so you stand out from the thousands of books in Amazon.
  • Social Media Ethics: What Private Practice Therapists Need to Know
    Familiarize yourself with social media ethics and use technology intentionally to educate your community and to build your private practice. The Internet and social media offer social workers and mental health therapists unprecedented opportunities to educate communities, to advocate for disadvantaged populations, to raise awareness about their private practice and professional services, and to establish themselves as experts in their specialty areas. Because people search online for health-related information, developing a strong online presence is increasingly important for social workers in private practice. One aspect of developing an online presence is through social media. Although social media sites were often originally seen as “kid’s stuff,” that is no longer the case. For the first time in history, more than half of adults in the United States—65 percent—report using social networking sites like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and others. Even though these numbers are continuing to climb, many social workers seem reluctant to use and embrace social media as a valid professional activity. Fear regarding breaches of client confidentiality, potential dual relationships, and maintaining personal privacy are often cited as reasons for this reluctance.
  • 6 Ways Media Interviews Will Help Your Practice
    Are you hesitant to respond to media interviews? Performance anxiety, lack of training, or placing little value on media interviews as a strategy for practice building may be among your reasons for shying away. You may have heard that interviews don't bring in an immediate influx of new referrals. I have been actively seeking media interviews on a regular basis for the past five years and I've never had a huge increase in new referrals as a result. However, I have seen many long-term benefits of doing media interviews, that have built my practice over time. Here are 6 ways conventional media interviews have helped grow my private-pay practice.
  • Why I Only Hire W-2 Therapists (W-2 vs. 1099 part 3)
    I've noticed that private practice therapist tend to hire additional therapists as 1099 contract employees. Reasons frequently cited for choosing to hire therapists as 1099 employees is that they don't have to pay the therapists taxes. While it may be more "affordable" to hire therapists as contractors, in my experience, there are also "costs." (For an summary of the difference between W-2 and 1099 employees read part 1 in this series. To hear about my employment tax audit adventure read part 2.) According to the IRS website, the general rule for classifying 1099 independent contractor is "if the payer has the right to control or direct only the result of the work and not what will be done and how it will be done" (italics added). It also states that an employee is not a contract employee if the services "can be controlled by an employer (what will be done and how it will be done)" and if "the employer has the legal right to control the details of how the services are performed."
  • Would Your Practice Survive An Employment Tax Audit? (1099 vs. W-2 part 2)
    Does the state tax commission really take the time to audit small private practices? I didn't think so, until my practice was selected for an audit. A few years ago my clinic was selected for an employment tax audit. Lucky me, right? When the auditor walked into my office suite and saw many offices with different names on the doors, he looked at me pleadingly and said, "Please, please don't tell me that these therapists are all classified as 1099 contractors."
  • The Difference Between Hiring Therapists As 1099 vs. W-2 (part 1)
    Should you hire additional therapists for your practice as 1099 or W-2 employees? I'll walk you through the decision process in this blog series so you can make an informed decision. If your private practice is thriving and you are considering hiring additional therapists, one of the major questions is how to structure the employment relationship. Should you hire additional therapists as a 1099 contractor or W-2 employee? In my private practice consulting experience and based on recent discussions in my Private Practice Toolbox Group it seems that most private practice therapists favor hiring therapists as 1099 contractors. When I ask why I often hear something like, "I hire 1099's because then I'm not responsible to pay the therapists employment taxes and it provides some cushion against legal responsibility for the acts of therapists providing contract services." While these statements are true, there is a lot more to consider when structuring the employment relationship and misclassification can be a costly mistake.
  • 10 Ways To Become A Go-To Media Expert In Your Field
    Want to tell thousands of people about your practice? Tips to landing regular media interviews. What do you think of when you think of professional networking? Private practice therapists who I’ve worked with in business consultations usually consider networking to be meeting with other like-minded professionals for lunch or handing out business cards to physicians offices. While those are important ways to make connections that build your therapy practice, there are other ways to get the word to thousands and thousands of people in one shot, instead of just a few folks at a time.  Rarely do therapists think of networking with producers, reporters and journalists. Over the last few years I’ve focused on developing relationships with producers, journalists, and reporters in various media platforms. There are a few who now contact me for quotes when they need expert quotes or interviews. I've landed regular local TV, radio, and news interviews as well as interviews with top-tier publications and shows: Wall Street Journal, Fox News, Parenting, Woman's Day, Women's Health, and others. Here are some things I’ve learned about what works when building relationships with reporters, journalists and producers.
  • Therapist Blog Challenge #3: Current Research On Love
    Summarizing current research makes great blog article topics and helps you stay informed about relevant studies in your field of practice. Since we celebrate Valentine's Day this month I want you to pick a current research study related to love and relationships for your Therapist Blog Challenge #3 topic. Summarize the study, then add your take on it. You may want to discuss why you picked this study, how your readers can apply the study's findings, what surprised you about the study, and what you learned. I can't wait to see what you come up with. Get blogging! Feel free to find your own love-related studies or choose from these news stories on recent research from PsychCentral News:
  • Adventures In Private Practice: Trauma Specialist Leticia Reed, LCSW
    Less than one year ago Leticia Reed, LCSW opened her private practice in Long Beach, CA. Find out what resources and tools have helped Ms. Reed muster the courage to open her own practice, what she's learned from clients, and how she manages her roles as "therapist" and "business owner". Tell me about your private practice... I opened Reed Behavioral Solution in March of 2012. My practice mission is: "Helping individuals, couples and families achieve hope, healing, wellness and freedom. Empowering my clients to leave better than they arrived is what drives me to provide the best and most effective services. I specialize in women's empowerment and trauma, although I provide a wide range of services to other populations in my practice. I also offer Christian counseling for those seeking spiritual connectedness as a means of coping and regaining a sense of purpose and hope.
  • The $12,000 Mistake Many Therapists Make
    Ending sessions on time or charging more for extended sessions not only models good boundaries, it's good for your business. What's the big deal about giving a few extra minutes to your clients? After all, we are in this field to help others and we are generous souls by nature, right? Yes, we are. However, an on-going pattern of giving away a few minutes each session adds up over a year's time. Let's say you see 10 clients for 50 minute sessions per week= 500 minutes. If you go over 10 minutes with each client you're doing 600 minutes of therapy and only being paid for 500 minutes. That means you're giving away 100 minutes of therapy every week. After one year of giving away 100 minutes every week you are giving away 5200 minutes of free therapy. 5200 minutes is the equivalent of 104 free 50 minute sessions every year. If you charge $115 per session your practice is giving away $11, 960 of free therapy a year!
 
 
Subscribe to Our Weekly Newsletter


Find a Therapist
Enter ZIP or postal code



Users Online: 13616
Join Us Now!