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Media Skills Library

  • 3 Things Potential Clients Really Want to Know
    We've spent thousands and thousands of dollars on graduate education, continuing education, advanced clinical trainings and years in practicum and under supervision. We have invested a lot in our credentials, and all of the impressive acronyms behind our names. PhD, LCSW, LMFT, RPT, CSAC, LPC  -- and the list goes on. In my twenty plus years of practice, I have realized that what we value as clinicians is not necessarily the same thing as what those who are considering our services value. In fact, there are some principle criteria that we as clinicians need to meet in order for an individual to choose us as his/her therapist. Of course, there are exceptions. There are clients who are savvy to the ins and outs of mental health credentials, trainings, and certifications and are seeking help from someone in a specific discipline or with specific training. However, as a general rule, potential clients want to  answer "yes" to these 3 questions before they select you as their clinician.
  • Extra! Extra! Using a Newsletter to Build Your Private Practice
    If there is anything you've taken from reading posts on Private Practice Toolbox, it likely has to do with the importance of having a strong online presence to educate and serve your community. There's a lot to consider: social media, blogging, podcasting, SEO, etc. But there's another aspect of building your practice that we haven't quite covered yet: newsletters. Newsletters are a tool you may consider implementing for your practice. A newsletter is a letter you send out to your clients and readers updating them on what's happening with your practice (it's a good idea to send them out monthly; you don't want to overwhelm your audience with too much from you, but you also don't want them to forget about you). They can be an effective way to connect with your readers and offer some insight on topics related to your specialty, inform them of any upcoming events or seminars, and just overall keep in touch.
  • How Media Exposure Can Grow Your Practice: Podcast Interview
    I thought you'd you enjoy this lively interview with Joe Sanok of Practice of the Practice Podcast about my private practice journey from a solo practitioner to a clinic with 3 locations and 20 employees. We cover a lot of ground during this podcast!  In addition to tips about gaining media exposure you'll also find: Tips to land high profile media interviews. The biggest lesson I learned when resigning from managed care. The book that helped transform my practice.
  • The Power of Online Presence: Blogger Dawn Friedman uses her Advanced SEO Skills to Rank High in Google
    Discover how some very successful mental health professionals use blogging, social media, and other technologies as powerful tools for their therapy practices. Dawn Friedman, MSEd LPC, is a clinical counselor specializing in issues surrounding family building, including infertility, adoption, pregnancy, and parenting. An early adopter of technology, Dawn started a blog that became the basis of her strong online presence and has helped her grow a thriving practice. Read about her story here:
  • Top 10 Best Books for Building Your Practice
    I asked members of my Private Practice Toolbox Facebook Group what books have helped them succeed in Private Practice and added them to the list of my favorites. Some of the following are specific to the mental health profession, while others offer insight that applies to the business world in general, but all of them can teach you valuable tips and strategies to use for your practice. 1) "Building Your Ideal Private Practice" by Lynn Grodzki This groundbreaking book is first on the list for a reason. Dr. Grodzski leads the way in offering time-tested strategies to grow and improve your therapy practice (read here).
  • 5 Common Barriers to Building a Fee-For-Service Practice
    Building a fee-for-service practice can be scary, especially if it means resigning from insurance panels and finding other ways to attract clients. Others may have already made the switch, but don't know how to successfully navigate the change. I have found some strategies to help ease the transition. Here are 5 common barriers to building a fee-for-service practice and ways to overcome them:
  • How to Make Sure Your Online Photos are Copyright-Friendly
    Graphics and pictures are a great way to enhance your social media engagement for your private mental health practice. They add something that words cannot, they show personality, they can break up large blocks of text, and they add visual interest. However, in our Internet age, there is a very real danger of getting into trouble if you use an unauthorized photo. The owner of the image(s) can slap you with a fine or a law suit.
  • 4 Ways To Use Pinterest To Build Your Practice
    Pinterest is a social media platform that therapists might overlook when building their online presence. It may seem more tailored toward foodies, pop culture junkies, or book lovers than for people wanting or providng professional counseling. However, Pinterest can be a valuable way to serve your online community and also get the word out about yourself and the clinical services you offer. Joe Sanock, an LPC who also works as a private practice consultant, explains that “People who go on Pinterest are dreaming about having a new life. It could be a new hair style, a new dress, or a renovation. They are in a mindset of change. As counselors, we fit perfectly into that mindset.” He says that Pinterest is his leading referral for both his private practice and consulting business. Bottom line: Pinterest can work as a great marketing tool for you (read more about Joe's experience here).
  • 3 Ethical Fears of Being a Therapist Online and How to Resolve Them
    Every therapist knows that ethics is a critical component of working with clients. Once you add social media into the mix, things can get even more complicated. I’ve noticed that unfortunately, some in the profession are resistant to embracing technology and building an online presence related to their practice because of fear of the potential ethical problems. It’s true that there are risks involved in going online, but we don’t need to be run by this fear; the risks can be managed, and, as we’ve talked about so many times before, the benefits are staggering. Here are 3 Ethical Fears of Being a Therapist Online, and How to Resolve Them:
  • The Power of Online Presence: Blogging Brings Training Opportunities for Art Therapist Lisa Mitchell LMFT
    Discover how some very successful mental health professionals use blogging, social media, and other technologies as powerful tools for their therapy practices. Lisa Mitchell MFT, ATR, LPC, is director of The Art Therapy Studio in Sacramento, CA and owner of InnerCanvas.com. She helps teens and adults use their creativity to heal from trauma, depression, and anxiety. Read here about how Lisa's online presence grew her outreach exponentially:
 
 
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