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Psychotherapy Library

  • The Power of Online Presence: Blogger Dawn Friedman uses her Advanced SEO Skills to Rank High in Google
    Discover how some very successful mental health professionals use blogging, social media, and other technologies as powerful tools for their therapy practices. Dawn Friedman, MSEd LPC, is a clinical counselor specializing in issues surrounding family building, including infertility, adoption, pregnancy, and parenting. An early adopter of technology, Dawn started a blog that became the basis of her strong online presence and has helped her grow a thriving practice. Read about her story here:
  • 4 Ways a Private Pay Practice Model Benefits Clients
    The value of using a private pay model (instead of a managed care system) for your therapy practice is clear: less stress about additional paperwork requirements, greater autonomy to provide the services you deem are in the client's best interest, and immediate payment of your full fee are some of the main advantages. But some therapists are understandably hesitant about how to make the switch because of the potential impact this choice it might have on their clients. Some common fears are “Clients might stop getting the therapy they need because they can’t afford me” or “charging a higher fee is selfish and means I care more about money than helping people.” When I was considering making the switch, I too had thoughts like these cross my mind. But I discovered that the opposite was true; breaking up with managed care and embracing the new way of structuring my practice actually benefited clients who received services. Here are 4 ways that a private pay model benefits clients:
  • Top 10 Best Books for Building Your Practice
    I asked members of my Private Practice Toolbox Facebook Group what books have helped them succeed in Private Practice and added them to the list of my favorites. Some of the following are specific to the mental health profession, while others offer insight that applies to the business world in general, but all of them can teach you valuable tips and strategies to use for your practice. 1) "Building Your Ideal Private Practice" by Lynn Grodzki This groundbreaking book is first on the list for a reason. Dr. Grodzski leads the way in offering time-tested strategies to grow and improve your therapy practice (read here).
  • 4 Common Business Blunders of Newbie Private Practitioners
    "Learn from the mistakes of others. You can't live long enough to make them all yourself." -Eleanor Roosevelt When starting out in private practice, there's a lot to know. A lot. The learning curve can be painfully steep, particularly in ways for which we received no official training (finances, hiring practices, etc.). And no matter how knowledgeable or skilled a clinician is, he/she will inevitably take a few wrong steps. And that's okay! We recently opened up a discussion on our Facebook page to get feedback about common business mistakes that therapists made when they were getting started in private practice. The responses were overwhelming; it seems many of you were eager to reflect on and share lessons that you learned the hard way! Though there were many answers given, a select few kept coming up that are worth addressing. Here are 4 common business mistakes to avoid when starting private practice:
  • Tough Love: How to Be Firm About Finances
    When you decided to go into the field of professional psychotherapy, it's likely that your reasons had little to do with money. Even as you first started, you probably didn't have dollars on the brain all the time (payments, insurance, fees, collections, etc.). Billing specialists deal with that stuff, not us, right? But those of us in private practice quickly discover how important it is to acknowledge and successfully navigate the financial aspect of our businesses. And resigning from managed care panels and switching to a fee-for-service model means that the responsibility to collect fees relies on the individual therapy practice; now, it's our job. I certainly understand that it can be awkward. People get weird about money. I used to be uncomfortable asking clients for payment after they'd born their souls to me. But thankfully, there's a way to conquer money anxiety, serve your clients, and still meet the needs of your practice and of yourself. Here are some strategies I've discovered about how to be firm about finances and present your stated fees to clients with confidence:
  • 5 Common Barriers to Building a Fee-For-Service Practice
    Building a fee-for-service practice can be scary, especially if it means resigning from insurance panels and finding other ways to attract clients. Others may have already made the switch, but don't know how to successfully navigate the change. I have found some strategies to help ease the transition. Here are 5 common barriers to building a fee-for-service practice and ways to overcome them:
  • Choosing the Right Electronic Health Record (EHR) for Your Private Practice
    The key to running any company smoothly is to keep meticulous and clear records, and psychotherapy private practices are no exception. Virtually all businesses today operate with an electronic data-keeping system; paper files don’t cut it anymore. More and more private practitioners are moving toward a paperless practice, which includes a professional Electronic Health Record. And advances in technology have created software programs designed for the unique needs of those in the mental health profession.
  • 3 Ethical Fears of Being a Therapist Online and How to Resolve Them
    Every therapist knows that ethics is a critical component of working with clients. Once you add social media into the mix, things can get even more complicated. I’ve noticed that unfortunately, some in the profession are resistant to embracing technology and building an online presence related to their practice because of fear of the potential ethical problems. It’s true that there are risks involved in going online, but we don’t need to be run by this fear; the risks can be managed, and, as we’ve talked about so many times before, the benefits are staggering. Here are 3 Ethical Fears of Being a Therapist Online, and How to Resolve Them:
  • The Power of Online Presence: Blogging Brings Training Opportunities for Art Therapist Lisa Mitchell LMFT
    Discover how some very successful mental health professionals use blogging, social media, and other technologies as powerful tools for their therapy practices. Lisa Mitchell MFT, ATR, LPC, is director of The Art Therapy Studio in Sacramento, CA and owner of InnerCanvas.com. She helps teens and adults use their creativity to heal from trauma, depression, and anxiety. Read here about how Lisa's online presence grew her outreach exponentially:
  • The Power of Online Presence: Viral Blog Post Brings Book Deal for Amy Morin, LCSW
    Amy Morin, LCSW could never have guess that one viral blog post could lead to a national book deal! Today, we continue with our series "The Power of Online Presence." Amy Morin is an LSCW specializing in adolescent depression, anxiety, and behavior disorders. Her now famous article "13 Things Mentally Strong People Don't Do" has been viewed millions of times and recently was made into a book. Learn more about what Amy does to build her online presence.
 
 
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