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Are You a Self-Critic?

Self-criticism is a nasty habit many of us have. When something in our work, school, or personal life goes wrong, many of us jump to self-criticism as a coping strategy. You might not even be aware that you’re doing it!

To keep our self-critical voice going strong, we tend to have “positive beliefs” about self-criticism and why we need it. For example, you might believe that being hard on yourself is motivating.

The truth is that self-criticism is not motivating or beneficial. It is however, good at lowering our self-esteem, and bringing up other negative emotions. If you identify as a self-critic and want to start changing your self-critical voice, here are some steps you can take:

1. Learn What Your Critic Sounds Like

Pay attention to what your internal voice says next time you make a mistake or something upsetting happens. Some people’s internal self-critic says “I’m so stupid, I can never get things righ.t” Other people have a case of the “shoulds”: “I should have known better. I should have picked up on that.” Identifying and becoming aware of your self-critical narrative is the first step to changing it.

2. Notice What Triggers Your Critic

Some people will have a self-critical response for many situations, while other people are triggered particularly by one aspect of life. Which situations awaken your self-critical voice?

3. Identify Your Positive Beliefs

Do you believe self-criticism is motivating? Maybe you believe a self-critical voice keeps you modest. Perhaps your belief is that your self-critic keeps you in control. Whatever your positive belief is, identifying your belief is crucial before challenging and changing it. A therapist is a good tool for this step!

4. Develop a Compassionate Voice

The antidote to a self-critical voice is a self-compassionate voice. Try to think of something you could say to yourself other than “I should have …” or “that was so stupid.” To help you brainstorm, imagine what you would say to a child, or to someone you really love. Your voice would probably change to one of comfort and warmth; it might become lower and more soothing. You might say things like “it’s okay, everyone makes a mistake sometimes” or “you couldn’t have predicted that, you did the best you could”.

5. Practice & Patience

Have patience with yourself while you tackle self-criticism. There is an irony to changing self-criticism: you can become self-critical of your progress against your self-critic! Remember that you won’t be able to silence your self-critical voice overnight, and that’s okay! It takes a long time to notice and change patterns like self-criticism, but the journey and work is worth it for your self-worth and happiness.

If you struggle with self-criticism, a therapist is a great resource for working through these steps and helping you to develop a compassionate voice.

Self-criticism photo available from Shutterstock

Are You a Self-Critic?

Beth Moore, M.Ed.

Beth Moore is a Registered Psychotherapist (Qual.) in private practice in Toronto. She specializes in cognitive behavioral therapy, compassion-focused therapy, and humanistic therapy. She believes firmly in a trusting and warm therapeutic relationship as a basis for therapy. For more information visit www.bethmooretherapy.com Follow her on Instagram at torontopsychotherapy or Facebook at www.facebook.com/bmpsychotherapy

 

APA Reference
Moore, B. (2015). Are You a Self-Critic?. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 11, 2018, from https://pro.psychcentral.com/are-you-a-self-critic/

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 22 Dec 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 22 Dec 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.