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with Heather Gilmore, MSW, LLMSW, BCBA

ABA

Factors of the Service Provider that Impact ABA Parent Training


Self-awareness is important for service providers. Although we often consider the behaviors and traits of our clients and their caregivers, we sometimes forget to consider our own behaviors, attitudes, and beliefs. Human behavior is complex. Our observable behaviors and private events interact and influence the behaviors and private events of others and vice versa. In addition to the influences of human behavior on other people, the environment and stimuli in our surroundings plays a role in our behaviors including how we provide clinical services.

When providing ABA parent training, we should remember the complexity of how our own observable behaviors and private events may influence the services that we provide as well as how we view our clients. For example, your own personal beliefs and views on parenting, cleanliness, discipline, and so much more can impact how you view your clients and ultimately how you treat your clients (the children you work with or their parents).


ABA

Personal Factors of the Parent that Impact ABA Parent Training


We, as ABA professionals, need to remember that parents are human beings, too. We know that everyone is different. People have different perspectives, different values, different priorities, different stressors and barriers in life, different backgrounds, and different experiences. The ABA professional should be compassionate and considerate of things factors when working with parents of clients with autism spectrum disorder.

ABA parent training may be influenced by many factors. One of the many factors that can impact the sessions and the outcomes in ABA parent training services can be looked at as factors related to the parent as an individual or the personal factors of the parent.


ABA

Punishment in ABA Parent Training


The field of ABA sometimes uses terminology that doesn’t necessarily fit with common language used by parents and professionals that aren’t so familiar with ABA. The concept of “punishment” is one example of when this sometimes becomes problematic. If an ABA professional is discussing punishment from an ABA perspective but has not clearly defined what they mean by punishment, the listener (parent, other professional, or whomever is the conversational partner) may get confused, get defensive, or just not buy into the message that the ABA professional is offering. Because language is complex and people make meaning out of language based upon their own knowledge and learning history, it is important to clarify what we mean when we, as ABA professionals, use various terms.


ABA

Considering the Application of ABA Concepts to ABA Parent Training


Applied behavior analysis parent training incorporates the principles of ABA into teaching parents effective ways of improving their child’s skills and decreasing their child’s maladaptive behaviors. There are many different concepts in the field of ABA that could apply to ABA parent training. However, this article will present you with some of the basic concepts of ABA that you may consider applying in your parent training curriculum.

ABA is based upon the science of learning and behavior. In learning, there are three different types of learning. These include: respondent or classical conditioning, operant conditioning, and observational learning or modeling.

See this article on the 3 types of learning for more information.


ABA

What is Parent Management Training? How does PMT Relate to ABA?


Parent Management Training is an intervention used specifically to treat children and adolescents with oppositional, aggressive, and antisocial behaviors. Parent Management Training, or PMT, is based upon operant conditioning. PMT involves teaching parents techniques to help their children improve behaviors and learn new skills. PMT, like applied behavior analysis (ABA), is focused on teaching socially significant or socially important behaviors and skills to improve the quality of life of the identified client.


ABA

Three Types of Learning and Their Relevance to ABA Parent Training


From a behavioral perspective, there are three types of learning. These types of learning are important to consider in the context of ABA services, specifically when working with parents of children with autism spectrum disorder. As a clinician, understanding the different types of learning will help you to see a child’s behavior more clearly and develop more effective interventions and recommendations for parents.

The three types of learning include1:

Respondent conditioning (or classical conditioning)
Operant conditioning
Observational learning (or modeling)


ABA

How to Become a Registered Behavior Technician


How do you become a registered behavior technician, also known as an RBT? This credential was developed by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB). An RBT is a professional who works one on one with an individual providing applied behavior analysis (ABA) services. The RBT works under the supervision of a BCBA, BCaBA, or BCBA-D. Basically the RBT implements the treatment plans that are designed by the supervisor.

The requirements to become an RBT can be explored in more detail at the BACB website on the Registered Behavior Technician page. In summary, the things that an individual must do to become an RBT include being at least 18 years old, having at least a high school diploma or something equivalent, completing 40 hours of training in applied behavior analysis including ethics, completing a background check, and completing the RBT Competency Assessment (which is done with a supervisor or someone at the level of a BCaBA, BCBA or BCBA-D). Lastly, the individual working toward becoming an RBT must pass the RBT exam.


ABA

RBT Study Topics: Professional Conduct (Part 2 of 2)


The credential of the Registered Behavior Technician (RBT) is required to abide by the RBT Task List. This task list was developed by the BACB (Behavior Analyst Certification Board).

One of the areas that an RBT  should be familiar with is the area of professional conduct.

You can review the RBT Task List on the BACB website.

The Professional Conduct category includes:

F-01 Describe the role of the RBT in the service delivery system.
F-02 Respond appropriately to feedback and maintain or improve performance accordingly.
F-03 Communicate with stakeholders (e.g., family, caregivers, other professionals) as authorized.
F-04 Maintain professional boundaries (e.g., avoid dual relationships, conflicts of interest, social
media contacts).
F-05 Maintain client dignity.

In our previous post, we discussed F-01: Describe the role of the RBT in the service delivery system and F-02: Respond appropriately to feedback and maintain or improve performance accordingly. In this post, we will focus on F-03: Communicate with stakeholders, F-04: Maintain professional boundaries, F-05: Maintain client dignity.


ABA

RBT Study Topics: Professional Conduct (Part 1 of 2)


Registered behavior technicians should be familiar with the RBT task list developed by the BACB (Behavior Analyst Certification Board). There are a variety of skills that an RBT should be familiar with and be able to implement in practice when providing applied behavior analysis services.

One of the multiple categories of skills that the RBT task list addresses is the area of professional conduct.

To view the RBT Task List view it on the BACB website.

The Professional Conduct category includes the following items:

F-01 Describe the role of the RBT in the service delivery system.
F-02 Respond appropriately to feedback and maintain or improve performance accordingly.
F-03 Communicate with stakeholders (e.g., family, caregivers, other professionals) as authorized.
F-04 Maintain professional boundaries (e.g., avoid dual relationships, conflicts of interest, social
media contacts).
F-05 Maintain client dignity.

In this post, we will be discussing items F-01 and F-02.


ABA

RBT Study Topics: Documentation and Reporting (Part 2 of 2)


One of the primary credentials in the field of applied behavior analysis (ABA) is called the Registered Behavior Technician. This credential was developed by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board. As a registered behavior technician (also known as an RBT), the individual must understand and know how to implement all items on the RBT Task List.

In our last post, RBT Study Topics: Documentation and Reporting (Part 1 of 2), we covered the first two items on the RBT Task List in the documentation and reporting category. These two items were:

E-01 Report other variables that might affect the client (e.g., illness, relocation, medication).
E-02 Generate objective session notes by describing what occurred during sessions.

To continue discussing the Documentation and Reporting skills identified for RBTs, this article will be covering the following items:

E-03 Effectively communicate with supervisor.
E-04 Comply with applicable legal, regulatory and workplace reporting requirements (e.g., mandatory abuse and neglect reporting).
E-05 Comply with applicable legal, regulatory and workplace requirements for data collection, storage and transportation.