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63 thoughts on “10 Common Signs of a Personality Disorder

  • August 5, 2018 at 4:11 pm
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    Wow. What a pile of uncited, unscientific, victim-blaming crap. Keep your quackery to yourself and stop stigmatizing people with personality disorders.

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  • August 5, 2018 at 8:29 pm
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    Christine,

    I enjoyed your article very much, and have dealt first hand with these personality disorders. I have finally cutoff all connection to these family members.

    Regards,
    Gary

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  • August 8, 2018 at 7:28 am
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    Is that paranoid and schizotypal are hooked?

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  • August 8, 2018 at 8:09 am
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    I do not like this article as it jumbles up symptoms from all of the different types of personality disorders. It is bad enough reading articles describing borderline (which has over 100 different symptom combinations) without throwing the rest of the personality disorders in as well.

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    • August 8, 2018 at 7:36 pm
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      If you had read this particular part of her article…”While each of the items listed are all of the PDs, a couple are more prevalent and more commonly encounted. In order to help identify someone who may have a personality disorder, below are ten signs a person may have a PD.” What she wrote about were subtle symptoms/behaviors that ALL personality disorders have – some just show them more than others.

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    • August 10, 2018 at 7:31 am
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      If someone has one PD, they can often have tinges of others, so it can be helpful for an outsider to have a list of potential behaviors.

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  • August 8, 2018 at 9:05 am
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    All of these are coping mechanisms – we deal with “stuff” as best we can until we learn a better way. Look for the light in people instead of the darkness – you’ll be happier and so will the people you try to “diagnosis”. Psychiatry is quackery!

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    • August 8, 2018 at 7:39 pm
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      The way that PDs “deal with stuff” messes up the relationships that they have and destroys those closest to them. Perhaps if those with PDs would step outside of themselves they would be able to see that…Oh right, it takes that good old “quackery” to make oneself better.

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  • August 8, 2018 at 9:11 am
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    I believe I’ve seen these types of personalities in everyone iv met pretty much, even myself. I’m not going to be judgmental and classify them as personality “disorders” as if there was something wrong with them. we are who we are because as kids we saw so many different types of personalities, our personality is the combination of the ones we were around the most. we cannot help it if it’s all we know unless it’s pointed out to us in a way that won’t offend us. confusing I know,this is why no one will ever change the way or who they are. our being is stained with the leakings of others, whether it’s a good or bad trait. if people just didn’t put any effort into caring so much about what other people do or say or how they act then it wouldn’t bother them now would it.

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    • August 10, 2018 at 7:35 am
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      What marks a PD is when these behaviors have a markedly negative effect on relationships and life. Of course anyone can vent about being a victim once in a while, but it’s not constant and it’s not at the expense of true communication and taking responsibility. It’s not shattering lives.

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  • August 8, 2018 at 9:17 am
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    I have been diagnosed with Boarderline PD. I am trying to figure out if CEN (Childhood Emotional Neglect) and BPD are separate dx’s. I perfectly fit both, plus I have left temporal lobe seizures. Am I doomed?

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  • August 8, 2018 at 9:30 am
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    Christine,
    This was a very helpful article. The article taught me new information as well as verified some information which I already knew. I have always been interested in psychology, but I am also an adult child of a narcissist so I am always looking to learn more about my own family’s personality traits as well as my own. We have a raised level of disfunctional behavior in the family.
    Thank you for this article-it truly helps.
    Also please note that I wrote another review about 10 minutes ago which I can no longer find—as a result I wrote this review to replace it. If both reviews end up posting, I apologize.

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  • August 8, 2018 at 10:40 am
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    Wonderfully informative as usual.

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  • August 8, 2018 at 10:45 am
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    Someone has a personality disorder, not IS a personality disorder. Someone has schizophrenia, not IS a schizophrenic.

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  • August 8, 2018 at 10:50 am
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    Thanks for perpetuating stigma with your language and your conflation of cherry-picked symptoms from a wide variety of complex disorders.

    Personality disorders can be challenging to the professional, I have personal experience of this. However, my reaction was to improve my understanding and challenge any instinct to demonise victims just because they may appear adversarial.

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  • August 8, 2018 at 11:04 am
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    Informative and helpful in my quest for understanding toxic individuals. In my own humble opinion, this document could be enhanced by including a brief description and/or the common characteristics of the PD cited. Thank you for sharing this information. I have printed for referencing.
    Have a great day.

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  • August 8, 2018 at 12:09 pm
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    Interesting the negative reactions tiggered by this article -not my take on it all. I think the author was presenting a quick snapshot of typical behaviors rather than an in-depth dissertation. Some useful nuggets of info for some of us.

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  • August 8, 2018 at 12:11 pm
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    This felt highly stereotyped and stigmatizing. At the same time that this site cries out for tolerance and a beyond-the-surface understanding of people in distress, articles such as this move us in the opposite direction. My guess is that the author knows better (if a clinician, I would certainly hope so) but that the more “click-bait-y” approach on display here is irresistible to writers and sites seeking readers in volume. Please do better.

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  • August 8, 2018 at 1:39 pm
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    How sad that a professional perpetuates some of the stereotypical and stimatizing perceptions that people have about individuals with personality disorders. I believe most individuals with disorders are multi-faceted as are people who are considered neuro-typical. I’m not sure what prompted you to write this article and feel you have done a grave disservice by oversimplifying and lumping so many people into the very derogatory term: PDs.

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  • August 8, 2018 at 2:44 pm
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    Christine,

    I find your article to be apt. Having personal experience with various personality disorders. I agree with your position. I enjoyed reading your article.

    Best,

    Carolyn

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  • August 8, 2018 at 2:47 pm
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    As another licensed mental health counselor, I am appalled by the languaging in this article. Some People experience personality disorders, they are not the disorder. To refer to individuals as “the borderline, the narcissist, etc is to put the disorder before the person. It reads as victim blaming and very judgmental.

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  • August 8, 2018 at 4:56 pm
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    Ms. Hammond,
    I am not sure whether it was passed by in your many years of schooling in counseling or, whether you are becoming many therapists who proclaim that Multiple Personality Disorder/Dissociative Identity Disorder, do not exist. I have been counseling these people for over 25 years. This is an area of personality disorders, it is the most intense but never talked about in the professional arena. Why is that? Has the psychiatric field just come down to writing it off & replacing it with Borderline Personality Disorder. It is important for me to understand this because it affects a large amount of clients, who have all been professionally diagnosed, come to me & I hear the horror stories off how they have been treated by consulting therapists.

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    • August 8, 2018 at 5:01 pm
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      The DSM-V does not list DID as a personality disorder, it is a dissociative disorder which is in a different family. I do treat DID in my clients.

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  • August 8, 2018 at 5:45 pm
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    Dear Christine,
    you write
    >Most PDs don’t ever stop being a PD with the exception of a borderline. This is the only PD that research has shown can and does improve with specific types of therapy.

    Why do you think that Borderline PD should be the only PD that can improve by psychotherapy. In the last decades, a couple of new treatments have been developed (like Schematherapy, CBASP, DBT, Traumatherapy) that can be applied to a variety of disorders with great benefit so that the criteria of the disorders including PDs are no longer met (if not recovered in total). Even if the brain cannot forget the past woundings and disfunctional Schemas may persist, they can nevertheless be controlled and thus be disarmed over time. While success for paranoid and schizoid PDs has turned out to be smaller, all of the remaining PDs are quite accessible to change if appropriate treatment (understanding the actual need and finding more functional alternatives) is found and can be trained long enough.

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  • August 8, 2018 at 7:52 pm
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    Ms. Hammond,
    My 23 year marriage ended in a divorce that for years I blamed myself. Everyone kept telling me that my ex- was narcissistic but to me, he didn’t fit the ‘traditional’ model of one with NPD. It has taken me a considerable amount of reading and research to finally realize that he is a narcissist and presents with a rather covert type of narcissism. These 10 signs are very telling of his personality disorder. Recently, when I finally asked my therapist if she thought he was a narcissist, she admitted that she had thought that for a long time. Thank you.

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  • August 8, 2018 at 9:23 pm
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    Thank you for this article . You described my friend who is diagnosed with BPD . She cut off our eight year friendship because of a innocent misunderstanding . She refused to talk to me about this .This happened last year . All of the symptoms stated here reminded me of her . Thank you for helping me to understand about BPD .

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  • August 8, 2018 at 10:31 pm
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    I have no doubt I am one of these PDs, just don”t have a clue which one(s)). If we go see a psychiatrist can we just ask him/her to evaluate me for any/all of the traits so I can figure out who I really am. I have been tested and know I am an introvert (to the extreme, IMO). So we could probably begin there. I don’t much like people and know most don’t like me. I have a few friends, but my two best friends betrayed me decades ago, so I tend to stay away from people if I can.

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  • August 9, 2018 at 12:32 pm
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    I think this article needs to break down what disorder is what, not just combine them. I lived with a Narc who was a mixture of a lot, but this article needs to break down, what is BPD, what is NARCS ;), what is Schizoid, etc….the information is too compounded into one… I also think that its not OCD that blames and makes a letter to give to therapy, but a narc. Otherwise, not too bad.

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  • August 9, 2018 at 3:27 pm
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    Jheez Christine, the passive aggressiveness & black generalisations in this article almost make it seem like you yourself have a pd. How did this nonsense get published?!

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  • August 9, 2018 at 6:46 pm
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    I don’t like how you refer to a person with a personality disorder as “the PD”. Would you say “the cancer? or the heart disease?”. This is offensive and contributes to the stigma around those with personality disorders.

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    • August 11, 2018 at 1:47 pm
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      I agree. I have an MSW. In my training I learned that a person is not a diagnosis. I would never refer to someone as a schizophrenic, or a borderline. Labeling can be extremely harmful and in no way therapeutic.

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  • August 11, 2018 at 11:15 am
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    Just a comment as a C- PTSD type…There are some of us who have been misdiagnosed all the way through life by displaying a lot of these behaviours because the event, or events have been erased by the trauma and manifest as such.
    I object to being held up as playing the oh poor me card when the traumatic memory loss was blocking the actual pathology.
    Yes of course , work was done when it was revealed many years afterwards more or less by accident, but years spent with acute anger fear and self esteem issues take some sorting especially as both my best friend and I who have worked on our respective traumas together were savagely treated by a parent as toddlers and then went out into the world with the emo root of our lives extremely badly damaged.
    One size does not fit all.

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