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8 thoughts on “3 Common Brainwashing Myths

  • July 10, 2019 at 11:02 am
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    This is one of the most blatantly unethical essays I have seen in a long time – and as an a forensic psychologist who has worked in many of our most secure (read: locked) environments and testified in hundreds of trials about real and alleged crimes, that is saying a good deal. It simply represents the grievances of the author, projected onto others. The reality?

    There is no such thing as “brainwashing.” “Brainwashing” is an informal term some media person came up with decades ago to describe the focused, often quite aversive techniques used by one group or person over another. Of course, a person in search of self-aggrandizement may then utilize it to apply to quite generic circumstances, like the ongoing evolution of a relationship that may or may not be going your way.

    Don’t get me wrong – assaulting another human being is against the law and every effort should be made to prevent it and to address its effects when it occurs. But, in fact, all of us are, hopefully, living and learning every day of our lives; learning about others, learning about ourselves, learning about the world. To describe this learning process as “brainwashing” and to apply it to clinical situations is simple distortion used to address the power needs of a poorly trained clinician. If you do have the misfortune to read this essay, then I recommend you try a course of meditation to unwash your brain.

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    • July 11, 2019 at 12:05 pm
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      Guess that’s why there are so many “forensic psychologists” available, such as yourself, with their own diverse, “educated” opinions willing to sell their wares (souls) to either side of a courtroom battle – innocence be damned. (poet?? philosopher?? – speaks volumes to your opinions). Garnered from your comment here, it appears you may have revealed yourself to be one of those “proud”, ad hominem attackers – yea, narcissistic, to which this essay refers.

      Don’t know how traveled you are, but would suggest a visit (a study) to some of the worst mind-altering countries (governments) and witness first-hand how “brainwashing” is, in fact, very real, contrary to your statement that, “There is no such thing as “brainwashing.”” Once you study those oppressed peoples of those countries, or even of local military personnel, or victims of religious cults (Jonestown?) then one might expect you to return here one day to apologize, not only to the author, but to all victims, including those victims maybe created by your own courtroom “victories”.

      But alas, that isn’t really expected of you, as seeing beyond one’s nose to gaze at his reflection is most impossible. Your erudition appears to be severely lacking, as would be your response to this, if any. So don’t bother, as its content (revealed by you) is already foretold.

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    • July 15, 2019 at 1:50 am
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      My sympathies to anyone unfortunate enough to be under your “care.” You sound like a sadistic monster.

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  • July 11, 2019 at 11:09 am
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    I think the important point here is that if one doesn’t regularly question their own belief’s, philosophies, standards, etc… we run the risk of taking actions and supporting ideas that may be deleterious to ourselves and others. Attempting to convince yourself that everything you “learn” is somehow positive or productive is THE absurdity of the times we live in. Ideas must continually be examined and re-examined by the individual and their validity judged on actual, real datum and not by one’s feelings or worse yet, by crowd mentality and/or “popular” opinion. Although “brainwashing” may be a harsh term to use to describe the phenomenon of swaying ideas in troublesome directions, anyone denying that they’ve ever “learned” or been swayed to believe falsities fits the description explicitly.

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