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20 thoughts on “What is Covert Borderline Personality Disorder?

  • August 5, 2019 at 2:04 pm
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    Absolute bullshit

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  • August 6, 2019 at 6:33 am
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    Borderline personality organization is the most appropriate way to look at this. The major issue is that trying to ignore basic psychology and label everything as a “chemical inbalance” that somehow can be treated with psychotropics only is a blind alley. DSM 4 is not a bible but only a way of categorizing observations. How many psychiarrists are trained in basic psychotherapy in our brave new world?

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  • August 6, 2019 at 12:04 pm
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    I am impressed with your thoughtful, empathetic approach to understanding your patient and certainly feel you deserve more respect than the “BS” comment you had from an MD. Your integrity has, it appears, survived the unscientific and fundamentally misleading DSM categorizing descriptions of human behavior into conditions. I say this because what you suggest as therapy is likely to be the most helpful to your patient–in the long run. But annoyingly the Gods punish us by granting our requests–it is in some ways unfortunate that Xanax wards off a panic attack and SSRIs block panic from happening. Even Inderal damps down the bodily response of increased pulse rate, palpitations and shortness of breath that pump up the fear of approaching panic–which by the way is probably the worst thing the human brain can do to itself. Sleep paralysis with spectral hallucination comes close second. Persons who have experienced both all say one of either is enough. 60% say panic attack is worse than sleep paralysis. 10 mg of inderal a half hour before going on stage is well known in the theatrical word to prevent paralizing stage fright. From my own experience of taking inderal–actually the extended release version metoprolol for atrail fibrilation–I found the mind confusing autonomic dysregulation–palpitations etc. I experienced while waiting to contribute to the question and answer period after a Psychiatric Grand rounds presentation went away. Unfortunatley I did not get AF till after I had told our expert on Borderline Personality Disorder that she knew that what she had presented was “BS.” When I was able to calm down I apologized and said I wanted to modify my comment to saying that she was adding to the vast mountain of artifacts of scholasticism.
    Enough–but before signing off– DSM does not explain what conditions are but describes collections of behaviors.

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  • August 6, 2019 at 2:25 pm
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    You know what…this misogynistic dangerous peddling of hatred of women is why and how abuse and violence towards woman continues. Always something wrong with women.

    Been raped? You must have a personality disorder and done something to deserve it. Object to being raped, even distressed by it ? Personality disorder. Got distressed when you witnessed a fatal car accident? Personality disorder. Raised a grievance at work because your male colleagues are paid more than you ? Personality disorder. Get anxious in dark alleys? Personality disorder. Looking for your birth mother after adoption? Clear abandonment issues and guess what…personality disorder.
    Want the vote? Personality disorder. And on and on and on.

    This is NO different to women being described as being too ‘ hysterical ‘ or wanting not to be treated as some sort of lesser being. This narrative, without ANY shadow of a doubt also perpetuates the culture of sexual violence and rape that is endemic in MH settings. Because, not only do you use child sexual abuse as a diagnostic indicator you then blame the victim for having very strong feelings about being raped. AS A CHILD. In the real world, we call this NORMAL.

    Having then victim blamed , MH professionals then attribute any aversion to being raped as a symptom of a MH condition that, just as when the victim was a child, must not be believed. So you EXACTLY mirror the action of the abuser.

    More than that, stating that women must be disordered ( and it is nearly ALWAYS women) attracts perpetrators to the MH settings where they can access now extremely traumatised women in order to abuse or rape. Knowing that their victims wont be believed. Any and all women, wherever they are in the world, can reel off accounts of rape, sexual violence and sexual intimidation in MH settings . As a woman patient you cant move for these accounts.

    What a disgusting narrative to peddle. Really really repugnant.

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    • August 7, 2019 at 6:48 am
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      I am sorry for all you have been through and unlike the “professional devoid of empathy writer” here I hear you and agree 100% that this is a disgusting and repugnant article. All this professional can reply with is defensiveness and @they are not all like what you describe” – Oh to the “writer” wow, no empathy- not even remotely fake empathy in your comment to this person.

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  • August 6, 2019 at 9:41 pm
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    The distinctions between “overt” and “covert” symptoms seem rather arbitrary – like, why is Brenda’s staying with her husband, regardless of the state of their marriage, a “covert” effort to avoid abandonment? Why are shifting patterns of alcoholism, drug use, overspending, skin picking, cutting, and binge eating considered “covert” aspects of impulsivity and self-damaging behavior? What’s “covert” about her experiences dissociating? I don’t really see Brenda’s experiences with BPD symptoms as different from anyone else who has BPD; all of us with BPD experience different symptoms, to different degrees, in different combinations, and at at different times. I think the distinction between “overt” and “covert” BPD is supposed to be understood here as rooted in other people’s experiences of us, and this doesn’t really make sense because it means one’s diagnosis as either “covert” or “overt” would change depending on the person doing the observing and what their relationship is to the person with BPD. More important, it seems like a distinction without a purpose, since it doesn’t sound like the treatment methods are any different.

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      • August 7, 2019 at 6:52 am
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        The distinction isn’t eve in the DSM “covert BPD” – that’s incredibly stigmatizing. Click bait needs for all the attention you can get!

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  • August 7, 2019 at 6:42 am
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    This is highly irresponsible and unnecessary. Why are you adding to BPD stigma and saddling it up to be more lumped in with NPD?

    Your “covert BPD” we all know quite fine already as the quiet internalizing BPD. Many of whom have more suicidality than people with externalizing BPD.

    BPD is an ever-more-evolving pit of pathologizing thanks to professionals who keep pushing the boundaries. The “empathy” in your writing does not drown out your need to propagate (along with Psychiatry) the ever-widening of what is a garbage dumping catch-all “diagnosis”.

    BPD is not a life sentence and people recover as king as they don’t believe what you and other professionals spread to the contrary. Yo say nothing of over 40% of all Mental Health Professionals who will not treat those with this diagnosis that is not as described in the DSM – it is a response to trauma, not psychopathology to continually be shoved closer and closer toward NPD.

    I read your article about how you believe those with BPD cannot recover. I recovered in 1995. I also read the professional who herself, responded to your last article in rebuttal and sharing that she too had recovered from BPD.

    People with BPD need to stop believing Psychiatry and professionals that write as you do on the subject. I respectfully agree with the first person’s comment here.

    You are using a pathologizing and stigmatizing “term” not even slightly appropriate in saying anyone with BPD is “covert”.

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  • August 7, 2019 at 8:13 am
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    I am not sure what the value of this extreme labelling and pathologizing is….

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  • August 7, 2019 at 11:47 am
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    Interesting article. I am diagnosed with CPTSD, and find that all these points is somehow accurate as part of my experience. What is the difference between BPD and CPTSD?

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