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8 thoughts on “Is It Possible to Fix Narcissism?

  • January 11, 2020 at 11:28 am
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    Ma’am, this article couldn’t line up w/ my daughter’s experience (and my husband’s) *any more closely* if I’d planned it. However, we did stumble upon a treatment that helped her, because she suffered from *chronic constipation*. (Seriously. A recent paper had shown that, if the patient’s parents had ADHD, adding a stimulant to the patient’s treatment resolved the constipation in ~85% of their study’s cases.)
    So, I wasn’t LOOKING for this treatment to be about narcissism and empathy. It wasn’t for me, so there wasn’t a placebo effect. It’s been over five years. The improvement is nothing short of astounding:
    adhdrollercoaster.org/adhd-and-relationships/was-i-raising-a-narcissist/

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  • January 12, 2020 at 10:02 pm
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    My fiancé’s Mother was a narcissist and I believe he is as well. Unfortunately at almost 50 I think change is hard if not impossible. His sister also exhibits many elements of narcissism. Unless it is worked on early I think that some elements of the narcissism will always be present. In my fiancé’s case he recognizes that the behavior upsets me, and is not behavior that’s healthy in a relationship, so he attempts to suppress it. However suppressing it does not solve the problem, it just seems to foster anger. He was only able to recognize the behavior after I pointed it out and he then looked at how his Mother treated his Father and it clicked. That being said, He needs to change his way of thinking, and despite therapy he’s just not getting there. I know there are many that want to hope change is possible, (as I do) but practically I don’t think it is very likely. Your child is your child so this is a different type of article, but you chose your spouse and I think anyone who is dating or engaged to a narcissist needs to do some serious thinking about whether they want to continue. I also think we need to educate people so those in relationships are able to see narcissism for what it is, often we don’t identify it until it’s too late and kids are marriage are involved.

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  • January 15, 2020 at 8:17 am
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    I am a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and survivor of narcissist abuse. I disagree with you that a Narcissist can change. They have no desire to change and no ability to change. They are cunning and dangerous people. Your article erroneously gives people in their lives hope and that is very misleading.

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  • January 15, 2020 at 9:46 am
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    Problem with the information in the biology section:

    According to Kendler KS, Aggen SH, Czajkowski N, Roysamb E, Tambs K, et al. (2008) The Structure of Genetic and Environmental Risk Factors for DSM-IV Personality Disorders A Multivariate Twin Study. Archives of General Psychiatry 65: 1438–1446, the statement in this article that, “DNA contains genetic characteristics that define the individuality of a person,” is not supported by the genetic research.

    The Structure of Genetic and Environmental Risk Factors for DSM-IV Personality Disorders A Multivariate Twin Study conclusion states: “Genetic risk factors for DSM-IV PDs do not reflect the cluster A, B, and C typology. Rather, 1 genetic factor reflects a broad vulnerability to PD pathology and/or negative emotionality. The 2 other genetic factors are more specific and reflect high impulsivity/low agreeableness and introversion. Unexpectedly, the cluster A, B, and C typology is well reflected in the structure of environmental risk factors, suggesting that environmental experiences may be responsible for the tendency of cluster A, B, and C PDs to co-occur.”

    This report, and others like it, point to environmental factors and NOT genetic factors as being at the root of narcissism.

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