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10 thoughts on “The Gift of Borderline Personality Disorder

  • June 29, 2020 at 10:54 am
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    This was the kindest, most insightful article about BPD that I have ever read! Thank you so much. You captured our strengths perfectly and reading this boosted my self esteem and made me feel incredibly validated. It’s always nice reading articles like this 🙂

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  • June 29, 2020 at 1:30 pm
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    Finally positive approach 👍🙂
    I found this article by so called “accodent”…
    Thank You for that, greetings from Poland 🙏💖🌈✨🌀

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  • July 1, 2020 at 3:21 pm
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    From a mostly recovered BPD thank you; this article sums up all the things in myself I made ‘wrong’ bc they were so different. Now I embrace these parts of myself and work to surround myself with those who value these parts of me instead of minimizing them bc they might make others uncomfortable. What a beautiful article. That IS the gift of BPD – what makes the diagnosis difficult to overcome also stays with us in a healthy way after it’s over. Win win.

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  • July 1, 2020 at 8:07 pm
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    My daughter had Borderline Personality Disorder coupled to a slight neural disability in that she was ‘slow to process’, slightly slow in movement and not good at reading others. However, she was highly intelligent. She was a good artist, poet, writer, and singer. She took her life seven years ago. She tried 11 times and she was so ‘crippled’ ( and I use that word in the best sense possible), I have to confess I knew. She was under a psychiatrist for years and loaded with medications. She blew up like a balloon and was lack-lustred, depressed, lost her creativity and without energy. She was told not to bear children and not to drive a car, both of which were entirely possible. As you can imagine, there was not a lot in life to hope for. I am so sad that she did not make it until 7 years later, when I know BPD treatment has changed radically and I think she would have a good chance of recovering.Read the website below and you will be surprised.

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  • July 7, 2020 at 11:36 am
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    I am a psychiatrist and I love reading Christine’s articles. This one is fabulous because many mental health professionals show disdain for their patients/clients and I believe that it is important to find things to admire in people one encounters in private life and as a professional.

    One particularly negative adjective in common use is the word “manipulative.” Its use tells me more about the speaker than about the person it was meant to describe. I always correct it to the word “resourceful” – a gift to perhaps add to the list.

    In mental health treatment, and in life outside the office, one finds what what looks for. I call it panning for gold. Seek gold and you will find it, it’s everywhere. Look for muck and you will find it and perhaps miss something interesting and valuable hidden within. Try it on yourself, ignore the muck and seek the gold in all areas of your lives then try it those around you. It is fun and people having fun live better and relate to others better.

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