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6 thoughts on “How PTSD can look like Borderline Personality Disorder

  • July 25, 2020 at 8:30 pm
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    Thank you Christine, could CPTSD cause similar symptoms? (I know it is not a “thing” according to DSM 5.) A whole constellation of emotional abuse, organizational emotional abuse, religious abuse, childhood emotional neglect, developmental trauma, even attachment theory constructs like caretaker misatunement come to mind.

    And could such symptoms also be mistaken for bipolar, particularly the milder forms? The intense agitation or depression could resemble (C)PTSD and similarly caused disorders. The client described sounds like me, without any horrible back story, just not a very happy life and a difficult ongoing situation. All I got from therapy was an eventual mild suggestion that I might be bipolar, but not a diagnosis.

    And can you shed any light on the modalities used to resolve such problems. My research indicates a lot of strange stuff, from Gestalt therapy and getting even goofier.

    Again, thanks for the great article.

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    • July 26, 2020 at 9:57 am
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      YES! I should have included it, thank you for mentioning it in the comments! It’s hard to say, I customize the modalities to fit the needs of my clients. A good therapist versed in several techniques is best.

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  • July 27, 2020 at 3:22 pm
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    C-ptsd is starting to be more well known. If you google, you can find some good articles from British mental health organizations, and also some bad articles. My therapist is psycho-dynamic in approach and very experienced, which I think is good. It seems like a hard thing about c-ptsd is differentiating it from other problems, as you have seen, that is why I think a lot of experience is important in a therapist.

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  • July 30, 2020 at 6:37 am
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    Yes, I went a long way down my road less travelled with a personality disorder label, only to find out very late in life that I had such memory blanking traumatic experiences as a child that the label should really be C PTSD.
    Many more psychological tools with which to heal this condition these days, though rejigging the formative base of my character, those first three years of life, and healing the split has been very very difficult.

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