advertisement

6 thoughts on “Understanding Schizoid Personality Disorder

  • April 20, 2016 at 11:39 am
    Permalink

    It is interesting to note how superficial – dare I say schizoid – a view most therapists have of Schizoid Personality Disorder.

    As a partial remedy, this weekend, April 23rd and 24th, the Masterson Institute is presenting a conference in NYC on schizoid personality disorder titled, “The Fortress of Solitude.”

    Typically, it is said schizoids have no desire for relationship. On the contrary, they yearn for relationship. But, sensing their core self is too underdeveloped and too fragile to be touched or even seen, the self is kept hidden.

    Relationship needs lead to fantasy relationship, or to pornography. Some have found attempts to relate lead to disaster. This is in part due to lack fluency in the unconscious communication that human-to-human relationships are based on, such as facial expression and body language. It is also partly due to finding that, when attempting relationship, their self is overwhelmed if it is exposded when with the other person. Thus, schizoids go through life yearning for what they fear most: relationship.

    There are several ways to keep the fragile self protected within its fortress. Some avoid all relationship. Some have relationships that exclude intimacy physically and psychologically. Some become social butterflies, juggling so many relationships that no single relationship is deep, attached, interdependent (and thus overwhelming), or threatening to the extremely vulnerable self.

    For deeper understanding of the schizoid, use the look inside feature on Amazon and read what Ralph Klein, M.D. has to say in the first few pages of “Disorders of the Self: New Therapeutic Horizons” by Masterson and Klein. If you find what you read enlightening, then make the purchase.

    Others: “The Empty Core” by Jeffrey Seinfeld and “The Private Self” by Arnold Modell.

    Reply
  • June 4, 2016 at 10:54 am
    Permalink

    How is this differentiated from Aspergers?

    Reply
    • June 6, 2016 at 12:22 am
      Permalink

      It is best to have a psychologist diagnose. This description is not meant to differentiate. Many of the disorders, especially personality disorders have similar characteristics.

      Reply
  • December 25, 2017 at 1:42 pm
    Permalink

    Take pleasure in few, if any, activities. Sounds a bit like anhedonia. Only social anhedonia, or regular one as well?

    Can be genetic. Does have similarities to Asperger syndrome, up to a point that the two can be confused, although most aspies do want company and are just overwhelmed by too much of it. I don’t like being around people, like silence, but feel uncomfortable with it because I might hurt the other person’s feelings.

    Reply
    • December 27, 2017 at 8:02 am
      Permalink

      Yes, there are some similarities. However, Asperger’s Syndrome is now part of the autism spectrum instead of a separate disorder which is very different from personality disorders. The two can be co-morbid.

      Reply
 

Join the Conversation!

We invite you to share your thoughts and tell us what you think in this public forum. Before posting, please read our blog moderation guidelines. A first name or pseudonym is required and will be displayed with your comment. Your email address is also required, but will be kept private. (Please note that we use gravatars here, which are tied to your email address.) A website/blog/twitter address is optional.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *