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60 thoughts on “11 Ways Narcissists Use Shame to Control

  • May 24, 2016 at 7:42 pm
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    Wow,all the points are so true.I can totally relate with what happened to me by one person.I know that the person is evil but after reading this article i now know that the lady is a narcissist.

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      • May 28, 2018 at 8:45 am
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        Hi
        Thank you for the informative information On a narcissist. I never experienced such a guy in my life of abuse cheating threats and such a roller coaster. I gave up my life by my family n daughter n moved two hrs away to buy a house that was in my name n everything else in my name . He demanded so much from me I listen n when I defended myself I couldn’t stop arguing n made me feel awful he never listen just put me down n talked about me my family me best friend. I felt miserable n living for him and I forgot about myself n helpless . At this point I lost everyone’ because of this relationship everyone tried to tell me but I kept going back n when I hit Rock bottom with my self my life was upside down n I was lost n in his trap . I had enough he cheated n abuse and manipulated me the time I cried so much got tried of all of it and the lyes n blame I throw him out weeks ago I wanted him to pay I kept emailing him n couldn’t get a hold of myself it was awful he was ignoring me but then he responded n realized it was a game he wanted me to suffer to feel pain and want me to run bsvk to him so we can be a family again he wanted my house I didn’t let him have it so he tortured me n I had enough as of a couple days ago I stop responding n feel so much better n not on his hook. I was so angry but I was hurting myself he didn’t care I was crying n going through it he loved it n took pleasure but now I haven’t responded and now the angry emails are coming thru but I want answer I just want to heal n be on my way to be happy for myself within . What do I do to heal witin to stay happy n not a ranging nervous wreak that takes up my life n hurts bad. I want to continue to feel what I feel now.

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      • August 21, 2018 at 11:52 pm
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        I feel for you as all you said here is seriously word for word what i am going thru with my Wife. I left my wife, pets and my home a year ago. Not because I wanted to but because I wasn’t wanted and always ( weekly) thrown out for the slightest reasons. Stripped of all I loved and worked for in an instant. I am still in the mix of it all emotionally and financially. I have recently officially woke up to fact i am dealing with a Narcissist. I go back and forth in denial that she can not be that voided but time and time again all actions and non-actions point to this and its so devastating. I cant seem to pull myself out of the trenches. Ive been in therapy now for eight months and i am no better. I know i need to go no contact and cut all ties for my own saintly and self preservation. It so hard to let go and its so hard to stay with such disfunction that statisics show will never change.

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  • May 25, 2016 at 8:50 am
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    Thank you for your work and research. I will go to Amazon and order your book. I am 64 years old and adopted my daughter when she was seven days old. She is now Thirty four. I have been her victim for years. No one has stood up for me because they don’t want to be the next on her list. Today is my 42nd anniversary and my husband has never stood up for me. She has been married four times,and lost custody of her kids. My grandkids adore me but are so scared of her they are forced to bow down to her. She can make someone miserable. I have decided to research and research narcissism, bipolar 2 and personality disorder. I must help others before it is too late for them. My daughter is an RN. I retired from a 34 year in public education and I have a Masters in Administration and Supervision. But my daughter has forced me to hide. She stalks me. I moved into a,gated community recently. I told her if she came here I would press my ADT and have her escorted off. Just today I’ received a lovely text from her birth mother. Her birth mother is just like her. I have resorted the past few days to retaliating in texts and it just fuels the fire and makes me feel horrible about myself. You cannot win with a narcissist.

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    • May 25, 2016 at 12:29 pm
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      The way to win with a narcissist is to know their next move and counteract it before they succeed. Eventually when they are no longer able to intimidate you, they will move onto another target.

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  • May 25, 2016 at 9:16 am
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    Now I understand why my mother used to hit me when I pointed out to her that she was wrong or had made a mistake, I do not in 40 years ever remember that woman apologising for anything she had done wrong. She Never missed an opportunity to make me feel bad about myself, she dismissed my accomplishments out of hand without a second thought. She was Right & everyone else was wrong no matter how Wrong she actually was. The “Face” she presented to the world & the one she wore at home were vastly different. She made life HELL for anyone that disagreed with her or god forbid saw her for what she really was.
    I say to anyone that has a Narcissist for a parent or spouse, walk away, no Run away, you cannot have a balanced happy relationship or life with these people, they will suck you in , bleed you , dry spit you out & then tell you it is all your own fault & that you are the one that abuses them.

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    • May 8, 2019 at 11:14 am
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      Oh my CallieG…such wise words. This ‘hit’ directly where it needed to for me today…You have allowed me to see that I chose a spouse who treats me in precisely the same fashion as my Mother did. Brilliant comment, and I thank you from across the Atlantic in France.

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  • May 25, 2016 at 11:40 am
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    Thank you so much for a wonderfully insightful article on narcissists. I’ve known for some time that my mother and sister were narcissits, but I’ve lived in a fog because I couldn’t put my finger on what they were really about and the feelings they would provoke in me. However, your article has put so much into perspective for me. I gasped at some of your comments such as how the narcissist competes. My mother who couldn’t compete with me on many levels, would use anyone in the family who could do it better than I… anyone who she deemed would ‘outshine’ me. For example, I was the top female athlete at my school and when I won awards mother would say that your not as good as so n so. Your comment that the person would feel that she/he would ‘never be good enough’ is exactly how mother left me feeling over and over again throughout my childhood. I grew up with constant put downs and belittling and have never felt good about myself. No area of my life was left untouched by my narcissistic mother and sister… my mother coached my sister too. Awful.

    What I need to know is and don’t understand is why a mother and sister can treat their own child/sibling in such a deplorable way. Would you explain this for me please. Thank you so much.

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    • May 25, 2016 at 12:25 pm
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      Unfortunately, part of narcissism is a complete lack of empathy for other’s feeling. They expect you to have empathy for them but they can’t have it for you. Because of this, they do not see their actions as hurtful. Rather, they believe they are making you stronger by acting that way.

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      • December 19, 2018 at 9:19 pm
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        That was so well said. “Unfortunately, part of narcissism is a complete lack of empathy for other’s feeling. They expect you to have empathy for them but they can’t have it for you. Because of this, they do not see their actions as hurtful. ” Moreover, they are brutal – I grew up with a person who is a covert NARC. She is a lifelong victim, denying all wrong, lying, they punish you for any question as to accountability, causing you to become the cruel villain. They are sarcastic, very convincing, they isolate you from all support, make you think you are crazy, using a simple tactic: deny all wrong, and project it back on to you.. then claim to be the victim. Everyone supports this madness, and Finkle is the mayor. They look angelic, happy, and nice. They have NO conscience , they are without shame. Covert narcissism now has a name, but when I was living this hell – I knew no one would believe what I was seeing in this person, yet she fits almost every criteria of a covert, from the age of 5, when she cracked toward evil by deciding to live a lie, and let everyone else carry her baggage. It is psychological abuse , they are the abusers and it is evil.

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      • May 8, 2019 at 11:19 am
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        Spot on…lucid observations…this article and your comment have concretised and answered many of the questions I was personally asking myself. Such intelligence! Thank you both….Much appreciation from across the pond in France!

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  • May 25, 2016 at 4:30 pm
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    Hi. I am going to college to gain a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology, and I am always trying to understand what makes people tick. On that note, I have a couple questions I wonder if you can answer, please? The first one has to do with why people become narcissists in the first place? Is there a specific set of circumstances that trigger it during childhood? The person above mentioned her mother coached her sister to be a narcissist. Horrible, btw. Is there a predisposition that makes someone become a narcissist more easily, even in childhood?

    Are there differing degrees of narcissism? I ask because there is a certain member of my family who doesn’t have a problem criticizing more helpless people in front of others and does it quite often, even when the victim hasn’t said anything to provoke an attack. Also, the family member who criticizes also constantly turns a conversation back to him and his life. For example, many members of my family try to have a normal conversation with him, and even when we bring up something about ourselves, he has to find a way to work it into something that affects him or has happened to him. It’s actually kind of comical at this point because it’s so predictable. The thing is he does do other things for people, and he genuinely has helped us out on many occasions without putting us down for needing help. There are also certain members of the family that he doesn’t find fault with who aren’t like him. On the flip side, he reminds us quite a bit about how he’s helped us over and over. He also tells other people all the time about all the great stuff he’s done to help us. He isn’t unbearable to be around, but he can be really conceited to be honest. Do you think he just has a really low self-esteem, instead of being narcissistic? Are true narcissists also sociopaths because of the lack of empathy they have towards others? Do you believe part of the reason they are narcissists is because they have a really low self-worth? Maybe that is why they get so offended when someone calls them out on something? I appreciate your input in helping me understand more. Human behavior really is a fascinating subject. But, since I also have questions about a family member, it would be nice to find out answers about him if possible.

    Thanks for posting this article. It is horrible to know there are people like that in the world, but at least if we notice that a person is a narcissist, we can be more prepared to deal with their behavior toward ourselves and others.

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  • May 26, 2016 at 9:00 am
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    Also those who like to inform people of information that they think nobody else recognises or understands.. The word is called know it all!!

    I recognise a lot of these traits, I have seen them in many, including myself when I was younger, due to early childhood conditioning and being insecure.. And learned behaviour.. Until I grew up and started to work on myself as I was very unhappy.. Today I can be proud and loud in knowing that I’m happy, stable, not selfish, and would help anyone in need.

    Some people have horrific upbringings which make them have these traits, and it’s quiet sad really.. Rather than put these people down as being toxic.. We should recognise some can’t help it. And if we can as a society try to advise anyone like this to get help.. Maybe easier said than done.. But less of the finger pointing!!

    To be that selfish where one has no empathy, I wonder what kind of upbringing they have had.

    It may not be down to an abusive childhood, it could be that one has been spoilt, and has had everything as in money but lacked love… It could be Various reasons!!

    I’ve seen people change their behaviour over the years, but we’re not talking severe behaviours here! But beat addictions and they learn to love themselves.. And have empathy 🙂

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  • May 26, 2016 at 4:22 pm
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    Why is it that some of us are so painfully drawn and attracted to narcissistic people? I am struggling with early detection and easy deflection, but I tend to get dragged in so far before I realize what is happening…

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  • May 26, 2016 at 8:06 pm
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    I am absolutely speechless right now as I read your article, all it’s missing is my husband’s name! I’ve only been married 6 months and always knew there was something but just couldn’t put my finger on it, FINALLY the answer!!!! Could you PLEASE recommend reading materials? Also, what are some of the ways to avoid falling into their trap by being proactive?

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    • May 27, 2016 at 6:19 am
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      There are several blogger on the psychcentral.com website who write about narcissism. Use the search feature to find them. This is an excellent resource.

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  • May 27, 2016 at 12:34 am
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    These tactics can also been seen in people with Borderline Personality Disorder and Histrionic Personality Disorder and sometimes elements of these appear in other personality disorders as the tactics are useful in restoring ego which is a common aspect of many disorders. It is probably correct to avoid direct confrontation especially if working with one of these types.

    Victims can build alliances working on group social dynamics to set boundaries notifying management and HR. If management and HR refuse to do anything, your best choice may be to leave that job. Lawsuit also stop Narcissists, but you need resources, very good proof and a very good lawyer.

    When in a relationship set boundaries and stick with them. Histrionics and Borderlines will generally leave when the going gets tough, Narcissists will tough it out, relying on their over-inflated ego to never admit they could fail. Usually the victim will need to leave.

    In any case, if any of these personalities ever become violent as they often do when triggered and frustrated prosecute to the fullest extent of the law. They will probably never be cured, but a prison term will prevent them from ever denying they have a problem and remove them from their victims.

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  • May 27, 2016 at 4:08 pm
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    The more I’ve read about this disorder — the more convinced my daughter’s father is a narcissist. We’ve been apart since before she turned 2 and she just turned 11. Just over 3 years ago, he filed legal papers — asking for full custody, decision-making and that I pay him child support. It’s been quite the journey since, but so far everything he’s pushed for has backfired on him. He constantly does things that make parenting hard on my end and impacts our daughter adversely. His new wife is also wreaking havoc on my daughter’s psyche and the transitions back from his house typically involve massive meltdowns. Because her father & step-family put a lot of pressure on our daughter — along with criticism — she feels she has to be the perfect girl over there. Bottles up a lot of anger, pain, sadness, frustration and so forth. Then comes home and it all explodes. Which is also really rough.

    Sometimes she even blames me for things her step-family have criticized her for:
    i.e. Daughter loves to sing and has been taking private lessons for 4 years. Her teacher loves her and this is one of the few areas she feels good about herself. Her step-grandmother started in on her because she’s not memorizing song lyrics well enough, and telling her she’ll never be a good singer. This happened when she was still 10! She expresses her frustrations to me and I did my best to support her. Later, she turned around and tearfully blamed me for not making her practice more. On my part, though I encourage, I don’t believe in pushing and bullying kids into doing things. It’s important to me that she enjoys what she does and that it doesn’t become a chore or obligation. Plus, she’s not the kind of child who takes kindly to being told what to do! 🙂

    I realize that for narcissists, their children are extensions of themselves in a very unhealthy way — that they need their children’s accomplishments to reflect positively on themselves. On my side — I grew up with that — and don’t need my child to be a performing monkey on my account. Though of course, I encourage & support her with whatever she’s interested in pursuing. The question becomes: how do you protect your child from that narcissistic parent? And how do you deal with that person, when it seems the legal system basically mandates contact with someone who’s toxic, unreasonable, and never puts his child’s interests first. It often feels like my relationship with our daughter is being poisoned from the the other side — both the narcissistic father and his new in-laws.

    I have many frustrating, occasionally heart-breaking examples of this — but from what I understand, I’m not alone in having to pick up my daughter from school (2km walk) where she’s not dressed appropriately for the weather. On a day where it’s a few degrees above zero and she’s wearing a light dress and leggings. No sweater. No jacket. Because he never dresses her for the weather of that day — only letting her dress in clothes that she has from my home. I’ve told him countless times: each of us has a responsibility to dress her for the actual weather that’s happening the day she’s leaving our place (because it’s not our job to predict the weather on the day she leaves the other parent’s home). This being the tip of the iceberg. When I told another mom at her school about this, her shocked response was: “Is he mentally ill?” Narcissism is a type of mental illness — right?

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  • September 10, 2016 at 8:12 pm
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    My covert narcissistic wife walked out on me seven days ago. She did it in the most hurtful, humiliating way possible. She told her entire extended family that I threatened to kill her and that she was afraid for her life. In eighteen years of marriage I never laid a hand on her in anger. She did succeed in making it look like it was all my fault though.

    I’m not doing well. I cry all the time. I have been recalling eighteen years of marriage through the filter of covert narcissistic behavior. Any of the articles I Googled on the subject could have been written about her. In addition I had to contend with her three narcissistic sisters that always came first and never stopped interfering in our marriage.

    I feel cold in my stomach that radiates outward to every portion of my body. I am starting pretty much from scratch now. It hurts so much to know that I meant nothing to her. I’ve known for years that she had no empathy but I thought she felt a minuscule positive feeling for me. I now know that there was none and that hurts so bad. I’m crying as I write this.

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    • September 12, 2016 at 8:12 am
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      I’m so sorry that you are going through this. You are not alone. I would encourage you to reach out to a counselor who specializes in personality disorders. Healing from this type of trauma is essential to rebuilding your life.

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  • November 12, 2016 at 12:46 am
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    i grew up with a best friend who bullied me as a child, but now has become what i believe is a narcissist. while reading this article, so many of these traits sounded like her. i know where the bullying came from – her mom bullied her as well. she used to constantly tease me and make rude jokes. i know she wasn’t doing it intentionally to hurt me, but i became very defensive and angry over the years (easily triggered) and lashed out at her several times. then started her accusations of me being “crazy” and her attitude of superiority. she would often act like she was better or knew more than me. she would try to “put me in my place” when she felt like i said or did something wrong. but if i tried to do the same to her, she would refuse to accept responsibility for her own behavior, and minimize the effect it had on me. or, accuse me of being unfair, angry and hurtful toward her. we finally had a big falling out when i sent her some emails trying to explain how i felt. i tried to apologize for my part in the situation while still trying to make her see her own part. she admitted it to some extent, but did not seem to really “get” it – for example, she said that the competitive behavior was my issue because i was jealous of her. after that i tried to make amends with her, and asked to forgive and forget but she cut me out of her life (after 17 years of close friendship). for 6 years i didn’t see her at all. then, after many attempts to reconcile with her (because i missed our friendship and she had many good qualities as well) we finally saw eachother. it went well and things seemed to be moving in a positive direction. but just today she cut me down regarding some comments i made about the election. it was more than a mere disagreement – it just reconfirmed that she still sees herself as above me and doesn’t respect my voice. she is very talented and popular on social media – she has thousands of followers and many friends, but i’ve observed that she treats them differently. i don’t think this pattern between us will ever change, sadly. sorry for the long rant but today just brought back years of feelings that have been somewhat “numbed” for a while.

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  • March 3, 2017 at 6:30 am
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    I appreciate the list to identify the narcissist however this advies :
    When a person can see a punch coming, it is easier to dodge. Resist the temptation to attack first with a narcissist that will only intensify their reaction. Instead, deflect and distract to avoid become a target.
    I do not agree with.
    I say call them out on their bullshit and get them out of your life forever.

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  • June 6, 2017 at 5:43 pm
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    I’m not going to wax lyrical about the content of this article, nor am I going to share my own experiences of having to deal with a narcissist in my life. I’m here simply to say how much I thoroughly enjoyed the article. Not only was it interesting and informative but, and this is an important but for me, this is the first article of this type that I have ever seen that is not gender specific, and does not, as so many similar articles do, place a male in the role of narcissist and a female in the role of a victim.

    For that, as a man, and a man who has been a victim, I am both profoundly pleased and extremely grateful. Thank you.

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  • June 14, 2017 at 10:43 pm
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    My daughter fits much of the criteria in your article. She does occasionally have empathy though – if I’m sick or injured, she is nice to me and will help with chores, etc. Otherwise, I’m constantly walking on egg shells around her and trying to appease her. She is very difficult and doesn’t recognize the behaviour in herself. If I call her on it, she says I’m being very defensive, just as you said in your article. She is very lonely and anxious. I think the anxiety often fuels her abuse. I feel as though I can’t abandon her, even though she is 28. She sometimes get so depressed that she can’t function. She has had lots of counseling and medication but has given up on it, saying it really doesn’t help her. I have been worried from time to time (not lately though) that she will take her own life. My question is this: for those of us who really can’t stand this type of behaviour and secretly want to scream and shout, but don’t feel able to leave our narcissistic loved one, what strategies can you suggest to deal with them, other than avoidance?

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  • October 5, 2017 at 3:59 pm
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    Thank you for this article! It sounds exactly like my mother. I have been struggling to overcome my intense self-sabotage, often suspecting that deep down I was rotten and deserved all the punishments that I subconsciously mete out to myself whenever anything good or happy happens in my life (and which I usually have worked really hard for). I finally finished cancer treatments and have been able to work full-time, so I’ve been wanting to celebrate with a tropical vacation. Yet I suddenly have all these unexpected expenses that are getting in the way, and it’s very depressing. I know it’s self-sabotage because when I’ve taken lesser trips, even just to the beach or to a stream, and want to enjoy the happiness of a dip in the water on a hot day, all these threats well up from within, dark things like “You’re going to die,” which terrify me because of my medical history. I re-decorated my bedroom and was so happy with the result, and then right away I thought, “I could kill myself right now.” I want to stress that I am absolutely not suicidal, which is why these thoughts are so effective at terrifying me. I fought really hard to live, and just want to be happy and at peace with myself. My mom is the ugliest person I’ve ever seen, and I’m beginning to wonder if there is something deeper than physical to that. I can’t even look at pictures of her, she is nowhere in my apartment, whereas the rest of my family is. She has always called me bad, evil and selfish, whereas she herself was a saint. I believed her comments until recently, I really believed there was something horribly unlovable about me. I never remember her hugging me or encouraging me. I graduated from college at 40 during the midst of my cancer treatment and she said that I was wasting my time with such trivial matters, even though that college degree was absolutely intrinsic to my career goals. Ughhh sorry to vent so much. It’s just really frustrating that I can’t even allow myself to spend my own hard-earned money on a trip to Hawaii now that I’m finally healthy and able to go. Whenever I’m around my mother I feel so angry.

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    • October 5, 2017 at 5:25 pm
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      You can get better and live free from the shame that has been imposed on you. Keep learning, understanding, and growing. It will happen.

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  • January 16, 2018 at 12:02 pm
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    After eight months with my “boyfriend” I have had enough! He is the definition of Narcissism. He often reminds me of a two year old. The whole “It’s not my fault” thing has worn out and now I just laugh when he says it. He also becomes very proper with his speech. Such as “One must wait sometimes” and “I shall proceed with reserve” – uses the word shall alot. Just ridiculous.

    I am a very strong woman and can not believe I have wasted eight months of my life with him. But no more. I am out of here. Oh yes, he started the blame shifting and verbal abuse right away. Sadly, I didn’t expect more out of him. I wish anyone who stays in this type of relationship the best of luck. I just can’t and won’t do it.

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  • January 31, 2018 at 10:18 pm
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    In regards to HISTORICAL I was surprised there was no reference made to a narcacist inventing history…I’ve found my daughter has an unbelievable ability to create a version of history that she truly believes …one that puts her mother and I in a poor light. What’s most significant thought is that you can feel in the hardness of her words live or in email that once said or written those words become gospel.

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  • March 9, 2018 at 10:21 am
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    Perhaps in a couple of instances an example could be used for clarity’s sake. Such as historical revisionism. Or is it history revisionism? I love being over 50.
    Thank you for the list, it is helpful.

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  • May 23, 2018 at 12:37 pm
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    Thank you so much for sharing this. It gave me so much clarity & to now believe this man will never change!! I have dealt with a narcissistic man for 15 yrs, and always made me feel inadequate & now I know why. Our children will never have father, they will never have that bond they share with me.
    Our kids love him but don’t want him around do to his maliputive way & his cheating!! It’s very hard!! I know better now!!

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  • July 8, 2018 at 8:39 am
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    Um… is it possible that some of these behaviours are actually, well… if not NORMAL, then at least perhaps COMMON, in teens?? Certainly one reads plenty online about how it is common for teens to behave ‘narcissistically’. I was married to an NPD for about 23 years, so I know what that looks like in an ‘adult’ (I put the word ‘adult’ in brackets, because the main defining characteristic of narcissists is ’emotional immaturity’ – so they are actually not, and will never be, true adults).

    My ex has been alienating my kids from me for years, and it worries me to see in your list many characteristics/symptoms that my 17 yr old has started to exhibit. In fact even more so than his narcissist dad.

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    • July 9, 2018 at 8:42 am
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      Narcissism can’t be diagnosed before 18 but the signs of it are usually seen 5 years in advance. Therapy for your kid can help to minimize the impact of this personality disorder, even at 17.

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  • August 15, 2018 at 5:48 am
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    It still isn’t completely clear to me the way to deflect the shaming that comes from a narcissist, my sister is narcissistic and I grew up so frustrated with her and my parents because I felt like they never believed me when she was cruel to me. I think that the genes come from my father who has narcissistic tendencies even though she is much worse.
    I have a ten day family vacation coming up with all the aunts, uncles, grandparents and cousins who continuously believe all of my dad and sister’s lies, how do I get through it without having a breakdown?

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    • August 15, 2018 at 8:53 am
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      Awareness is the first step, next is anticipation. When you know an attack is coming, you can prepare a response that is not defensive but rather dismissive or sarcastic. That usually works.

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  • August 19, 2018 at 3:09 pm
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    I was raised by a narcissistic stepfather and my mother who adores him. I didn’t know he wasn’t my real father until a few years ago, I’m 63 now – long story. But the problem is that I have gone no contact with both of them and now they are gas-lighting my grown sons and turning them against me and my husband. The good thing is that we live in another state but he manipulates our sons into going to visit them and then badmouths my husband and I. How do we fight this? My hope is that our sons know us better than that but this guy is really really good at manipulation and brainwashing. He’s bee doing it to my mother and other family members and friends for as long as I can remember. I don’t know what to do. I don’t talk about him or my mother to my sons because I don’t want to put them in the middle of this mess but he has no qualms about that.

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  • July 14, 2019 at 3:37 pm
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    What a spot on statement, “weakness of a narcissist is their extreme hatred of being embarrassed”. I believe we can learn more about narc traits in advance of possible future people who may come into our lives! Cheryl L. Wheeler, MA

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  • August 9, 2019 at 11:32 pm
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    I’ve been married to a narcissist for over 30 years. The mother described by CallieG above sounds exactly like his mother. The interesting thing is, he now defends his mother (his abuser), and has a decent relationship with her. I don’t understand how this is possible. And his brother and sister are not narcissists…his brother was her favorite, and the one she pitted against my husband and his sister by constantly praising him in front of them…and it extended to his one and only child, who she completely favors over our children. I would love to see more information on the family dynamics, and how one child can become a narcissist while others don’t. And why he has “forgiven” his mother (if you can call it that) and is not willing to admit she abused him. Thanks for all the information!

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  • August 29, 2019 at 7:00 am
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    Came here after thinking about my narcissist mother. Apparently she’d been telling a lot of people that I was old, haggard, incredibly badly dressed, slouchy, with bad posture. I’m a fashion model and am booked for magazine photo shoot on a monthly basis. I live in two countries, far away from her so the people she’s talking to don’t know what I look like. One of my cousins tried to defend me by showing her photos of me that were shared by magazine readers online. One day, I opened a social media account and put a photo of myself from a recent editorial shoot on it. The caption/strapline read, “Here to address the rumours of my rapid decline into haggard decrepitude at the age of 36!” I shared photos and recipes for my meals – breakfast, lunch, dinner. When enough people complimented me on the photos of my delicious, healthy meals, I closed the account. Mostly, it was to avoid having to interact with her. Because of course you knew she was on there trying to ask me how I was doing. After saying those nasty things behind my back.

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  • August 30, 2019 at 9:27 pm
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    In our house there is the grandson who constantly torchers everyone in the house!He takes turns with everyone is plots them against each other then just sit backs& grins! He has no respect for women at all as he curses one week& plays up to the other.He.has his.brother brainwashed into thinking he has a point in reality he pulls the same stunt on him tells him he’s worthless,he has even got so out of control there has been physical fights & he was court ordered to not be here,in saying that it doesn’t stop him because it would be someone else’s fault if he got in trouble for being there! He is mentally & physically abusive towards animals also! I really don’t think the rest of the family knows what he is really up2 they just assume he is mentally challenged he has even convinced the mamaw to file ssi benefits,it’s sad really he is perfectly aware of what he is doing! Not to mention he drives a car among other things he is far from mentally challenged that is just a cop out to justify his behavior & brainwash them.he knows I’m on to him so I’m left out of his antics it still affects my life when it disturbs the whole house!

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