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17 thoughts on “The Three Personality Disorders Prevalent in Religious Environments

  • July 6, 2016 at 12:07 am
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    Small typo… The title says 3 disorders, but the introduction says: “…these four disorders can be found within the leadership structure…”

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  • July 6, 2016 at 4:01 pm
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    I think you intended for there to be a fourth (Freudian slip? LOL), but didn’t include it. Borderline Personalities also fit in well with organized religion. They get to be sinner and saint both, and a righteously indignant victim of Satan’s minions. They get to canonize others, or demonize them if they step away from dogma. I spent my childhood in and out of multiple denominations. Most of them, especially the churches of the wealthy, were no place god would want to be.

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  • July 7, 2016 at 4:41 pm
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    Hi, just found your website and interested in your observations. Is it possible to have a person present with two of these disorders – say the Narcissistic Personality Disorder and the Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder?
    Thanks

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    • July 8, 2016 at 4:32 am
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      Yes, in fact I’ve seen some with characteristics of three personality disorders. This is why APA strongly considered modifying the definition of personality disorders in the last revision of the DSM-V.

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  • August 8, 2016 at 11:15 am
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    This site is an incredible find!!

    I have always been associated with the Southern Baptists, and with a very holy, righteous, and fairly legalistic, upper middle-class family. They are in church every time the doors are open and are pillars of the church…..deacon, choir director, Sunday School teachers….you name it.

    One sister has been married twice, and both others are in dysfunctional, emotionless marriages.

    As I watch at family functions, I find it fascinating how they treat those closest to them, especially their mother and their husbands. It “feels” to my untrained eye, like contempt. One sister speaks well of all and laughs and plays, but when the subject of her husband comes up she visibly changes: her eyes narrow, her jaw clenches, contempt drips. They worship their father and wish us husbands were he.

    I have no clue where this may fit into the scope of your article….but if you have insight, I’m a sponge.

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  • May 30, 2018 at 6:26 am
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    Are you aware of any scientific studies on this topic that can provide empirical evidence for the idea that certain personality disorders are prevalent in religious environments? Anecdotally, from my personal experience this rings true, but I would like to see some studies that support this notion.

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  • June 7, 2019 at 8:47 am
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    Belief in an Imagined Other or Others is ALWAYS evidence of pathology. For an explanation of the origins of religious belief, read Beyond Belief by Arthur Janov Ph D. A mature society would have no police, no religious belief, no crime. We are not mature, we are still abusing our children by means of religion and by means of so-called “education” The USA has a brutal and brutalised police presence, a medieval so-called “justice” system which is anything but justice, and levels of poverty, crime, and violence comparable to Zimbabwe. It is infested with the foul darkness that is religion, handed down for generations as contamination from parent to child. The three so-called personality disorders you quote are not accidentally and randomly to be found in religious gatherings. Such gatherings could not manifest unless sufficient numbers of mentally disordered persons were available. Mental disorder is what defines religious belief.

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      • July 28, 2019 at 12:18 pm
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        Sadly, most published papers on religion and mental health see a positive correlation between religious belief and good mental health. Religious people tend to be more conscientious , less likely to engage in anti-social behaviour, abuse drink and drugs. These factors mean than religious people also live longer, on average, than the non-religious. I have no idea where you are getting your ideas.

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