advertisement
Private Practice
with Julie Janks, MSW, LCSW, BCD

Business

Why Therapists Need An Elevator Speech

An "elevator speech," also called a basic practice message, is a brief statement of what you do. It should take no longer than it takes to ride a few floors on an elevator and is a crucial aspect of marketing your private practice.

Whenever you talk about or write about your practice, your elevator speech will help you to provide a cohesive and consistent message that attracts your ideal client and builds your private practice. Over time, your message will help you create enough awareness about your practice that people will know who you are and what you do.

The goal is to have people say, "Oh, he's the one who helps couples create closer marriages." or "She's the therapist who helps kids with attention problems find ways to succeed in school."


General

Why Social Media Matters to Therapists

You're in the mental health field because you want to make a difference and make a living, right? Technology and new media now allow therapists to educate and interact with worldwide audience and to talk directly to ideal clients...for free.

Take a look at these recent statistics from the top social media sites:

There are 750 million active users (Facebook.com)
200 million Tweets go out daily on Twitter (Twitter.com)
Over 400 billion YouTube videos videos are viewed each day (

Business

Does Google Love Your Therapy Practice?

When is the last time you opened a phone book, looked in an actual encyclopedia, opened a dictionary, or navigated with an  paper map? The Internet has revolutionized where we go for information. The several hundred million Google searches every day include searches by potential clients looking for your expertise, your niche, and your services. Can they find you?

Try Googling your name, or your therapy practice, or your specialty areas in your city. Where do you come up in the Google search? On the first page or on page number 25? If Google can't easily find you then neither can potential clients who are searching for you and your specific therapy services.


Business

Who’s Your Ideal Client?

“Who do you want to work with?” was the question I asked workshop participants in a recent private practice workshop at a local university. For many workshop participants, this was the first time they’d ever even considered asking themselves which clients they wanted to see in their clinical practice.

Shrinking funding, crowded managed care panels, and a saturation of therapists have  left private practitioners feeling desperate to fill their schedules with anyone who is willing to see them.  However, based on my personal experience of nearly a decade in private practice, “Who do I want to work with?” is one of the most important questions a clinician can ask themselves.