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F E A T U R E D    A R T I C L E

Using Applied Tension for Blood and Needle Phobias

November 20th, 2014
A common—but often overlooked and misunderstood—psychiatric disorder is the phobia of blood and needles. Although generally slight and psychosocially inconsequential, most people become a little uncomfortable when confronted with blood or a needle. However, for some, the reaction can be extreme and go well beyond ...


From Private Practice Toolbox:

Therapist Blog Challenge #17: Surviving the Holidays

challenge_17 Therapist blog challenge #17 focuses on how to help readers make it through the crazy emotional stress of the holiday season. Headline Come up with a catchy title for your blog post.  Here are a few examples: Crazy Christmas and Hectic Hanukkah! How to Make it Through the Holidays How to Survive Holiday Chaos and Have Fun with ...
From Reflections from a Children's Therapist:

Why Some Kids Bounce Back from Challenges and Others Don’t

Here is an amazing infographic I came across from the blog of Renee Jain, MAPP, called Stress Better here on Psych Central. It describes why some kids are able to bounce back when they experience a challenging situation while other kids struggle to overcome difficulties. (This information applies to adults, too.) ABCs_Final112114_rev5 ...
From Private Practice Kickstart:

Starting a Counseling Practice Part 3: Your Business Plan

Starting a Counseling Practice Part 3: Your Business PlanThe four little words that strike fear into the hearts of therapists “Create a Business Plan.” We’ve already talked about how we’ve found that less than 15% of therapists in private practice report having a business plan, and how that negatively impacts them. A business plan Let’s talk about what should ...

Types of Dementia

Types of Dementia

Current News on Medications and Research

News of Note ANTIPSYCHOTICS APA Warns Against Common Uses of Antipsychotics In September 2013, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) released a list of common, but potentially dangerous and inappropriate, uses for antipsychotics. The APA’s list includes the following recommendations:   Don’t prescribe any antipsychotics without an appropriate initial evaluation and ongoing monitoring Don’t routinely prescribe two or more antipsychotic medications together Don’t prescribe antipsychotics as first-line treatment for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia Don’t routinely prescribe antipsychotics as first-line treatment of insomnia in adults   Don’t ...

 

3 Tips for Working Effectively with Dreams

Jim brings the following dream into session: He’s Edgar Allan Poe. Two birds are circling above him high overhead. If he holds up his right hand, a dove will fly down and perch on it. If he holds up his left, a raven will. He’s drawn to the raven but fearful that he’ll be overwhelmed by its enormous black wings. He remembers, though, that he’s Poe, has written a poem about ravens, and knows something about them. It’s still risky, but he decides to hold up his ...

Paranoid Personality Disorder in Legal Practice

The inherent difficulty in working with clients with paranoid personality disorder (PPD) is that these individuals are incapable of truly trusting anyone. People with PPD are most frequently involved in litigation. The individual with PPD has a basic mistrust of others that manifests itself in four or more of the following ways: Expectation, without sufficient basis, that others are deceiving or taking advantage of him or her; Preoccupation with doubts as to the loyalty or trustworthiness of friends and associates without sufficient basis; Reluctance to confide in others because of ...

A Blood Test for Suicide?

Research Updates in Psychiatry Scientists May Have Found a Genetic Marker for Suicide. Prediction of suicidal behavior has long been considered more of an art than a science, although the use of clinical and demographic features can help improve risk assessment (see, for instance, TCPR, June 2012). An accurate biological test or “biomarker” for suicidality would be valuable, and a recent study takes us one step closer to that goal. In preliminary work, researchers retrospectively evaluated blood samples from ...


A Blood Test for Suicide?

Research Updates in Psychiatry Scientists May Have Found a Genetic Marker for Suicide. Prediction of suicidal behavior has long been considered more of an art than a science, although the use of clinical and demographic features can help improve risk assessment (see, for instance, TCPR, June 2012). An accurate biological test or “biomarker” for suicidality would be valuable, and a recent study takes us one step closer to that goal. In preliminary work, researchers retrospectively evaluated blood samples from ...

Strange New World: History, Hypnosis & Trance

The phenomenon we commonly term hypnosis actually refers back to the half-century old theories of animal magnetism and mesmerism. Scholars later adopted an altered-state view and described ancient healing rituals in Western and Eastern civilizations as forerunners of modern hypnosis. To understand hypnosis, it is essential to note its relationship with demonic possession and hysteria. Hypnosis began in ancient Egypt, where it was viewed as the result of the movement of the uterus to the affected part of the body. Hysteria, by virtue, was viewed as a disorder specific ...

 

Is Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) the Answer to Suicide?

Is Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) the Answer to Suicide?A Historical Perspective on Suicide The etymological roots of the word ‘suicide’ are derived from the Latin word suicidium; sui, ‘of oneself’ and cidium, ‘a killing.’ The term was first used by the abbots Prevost in 1734 and Desfontaines in 1737 (Sarro & de la Cruz, 1991) but it is likely that suicide has been a human phenomenon ever since man began to organize himself into tribes. Recent anthropological studies (Washburn, 2004), have ...

Psychiatric Illness in the Elderly

Q & A With the Expert: Psychiatric Illness in the Elderly The following is an interview with Dan Blazer, M.D., Ph.D, M.P.H., of Duke University, on treating psychiatric disorders in the elderly. TCPR: Apart from the obvious problems like memory disorders and dementia, what should we know about psychiatric issues in the elderly? Dr. Blazer: One thing to begin with is to recognize that in general surveys of happiness, contentment, and well-being, older persons for the most part score higher than people in ...

Self-Medication of Mood Symptoms with Alcohol is a Risk Factor for Alcohol Dependence

Research UpdatesPatients often report alcohol use as a way to “self-medicate” mood symptoms. A new study demonstrates that this self-medication may serve as a precursor to the development or persistence of alcohol dependence, as defined by the DSM-IV. Researchers evaluated the 43,093 adults who participated in the NESARC survey, a national survey of American adults consisting of face-to-face interviews at two time points, in 2001–2002 and in 2004–2005. Participants were asked about their drug and alcohol use and ...

What Does Integrative Mental Health Care Look Like?

Q & A With the Expert: Integrative Mental Health CareThis is an interview with Dr. James Lake regarding integrative medicine. TCPR: Dr. Lake, please tell us what integrative medicine is. Dr. Lake: In the broadest sense, integrative medicine encompasses methods and research findings from both mainstream biomedicine and the range of so-called complementary and alternative (CAM) specialties including, for example, acupuncture, naturopathic medicine, and homeopathy. Integrative medicine acknowledges the advantages and limitations of the dominant biomedical model while recognizing ...

Optimal Treatment for First Episode of Psychosis

Research Updates in PsychiatryIs Dose Reduction the Ideal Strategy after First Episode of Psychosis? What’s the optimal treatment for a first episode of psychosis? Few would argue against antipsychotic treatment, but what happens when the patient achieves remission? Is it best to continue medication indefinitely, or can the antipsychotic be reduced or discontinued altogether? One hundred and twenty eight patients who had a first episode of psychosis (FEP) in 2001–2002 were successfully treated with antipsychotics. Of these, half were ...

Anxiety Disorders in DSM-5 & Beyond

Anxiety Disorders in DSM-5 and BeyondTCPR: Dr. Pine, can you describe the background on the two new categories for anxiety disorders in DSM-5: Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders and Trauma- and Stressor-Related Disorders? Dr. Pine: First, I will say that the overall changes from the standpoint of the day-to-day practice of a clinician are pretty mild and minor. The biggest change to anxiety disorders in DSM-5 is taking a collection of syndromes that were all grouped together in DSM-IV and splitting ...